Impact Pricing Podcast

#387: Pricing for Success: The Seven-Step Plan for Winning More Customers at Better Prices with Mark Peacock

Mark Peacock has been a pricing consultant since 2017. Currently, he is the managing director of Price Maker, a company that helps their businesses differentiate themselves from the competition by means of having a smarter pricing. He is also about to release his new book titled “Pricing for Success: The Seven-Step Plan for Winning More Customers at Better Prices

In this episode, Mark talks about what’s written in his newest book, “Pricing for Success: The Seven-Step Plan for Winning More Customers at Better Prices”. He shares the fundamental ideas behind the seven steps and gives insightful sample situations in which the seven steps can be applied.

Why you have to check out today’s podcast:

“Take the time to do your pricing strategy properly, and put your prices up because it is the most powerful lever you can use to increase profitable growth.”

Mark Peacock

Topics Covered:

01:27 – How Mark got into pricing

02:35 – The reason why Mark wrote his book, “Pricing for Success: The Seven-Step Plan for Winning More Customers at Better Prices

03:42 – Step 1: Where do you want to go?

06:43 – Step 2: Know what your customers think about you

08:02 – Step 3: Being aware of your competition

11:02 – Step 4: Product

13:13 – Step 5: Pricing

15:45 – Mark Peacock’s thoughts on having more than one pricing model for a product

17:17 – Step 6: Proposition

19:21 – Mark Peacock’s favorite behavioral economics example

22:47 – Step 7: Profit

24:53 – How Mark would address the issue of credit grabbing among departments in cases of sales improvement

28:59 – Mark’s pricing advice

30:09 – Connect with Mark Peacock

 

Key Takeaways: 

“Pricing, ultimately, is always a subset of business strategy, of your company goals. So, you’ve got to be clear. You got to know where you want to get to. Otherwise, you’ll end up floundering with your pricing.” – Mark Peacock

“Product and price are two sides of the same coin. When I buy products for a price, I want to know what I get as a customer and equally as a seller, you need to know everything that’s included in your product offering.” – Mark Peacock

“Without changing the pricing, you can achieve an effective increase in prices of 4% by changing how you present the prices. And I think this whole question of how we present pricing is just as important as ‘What’s the number? What’s the strategy?’ Because it makes such a difference.” – Mark Peacock

“Having a clearly written pricing policy is such an important thing. And I literally say in my book, ‘Write it down’. And it doesn’t have to be long, it doesn’t have to be complicated.” – Mark Peacock

 

People / Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Mark Peacock:

Connect with Mark Stiving:   

 

Full Interview Transcript

(Note: This transcript was created with an AI transcription service. Please forgive any transcription or grammatical errors. We probably sounded better in real life.)

Mark Peacock

Take the time to do your pricing strategy properly, and put your prices up because it is the most powerful lever you can use to increase profitable growth.

Mark Stiving

Welcome to Impact Pricing, the podcast where we discuss pricing, value, and the amazing relationship between them. I’m Mark Stiving, and our guest today is Mark Peacock. And here are three things you’d want to know about Mark before we start: He has been consulting in pricing since 2017 and is currently the managing director of Price Maker. He’s about to release a brand-new book titled “Pricing for Success: The Seven-Step Plan for Winning More Customers at Better Prices”. I cannot wait to talk to him about that. He’s also a second time guest. His last appearance was July 5th, 2021. Oh, and he used to run the two largest driving schools in the UK. And I’m pretty sure he stopped that because everybody kept driving on the wrong side of the road. Welcome, Mark.

Mark Peacock

Thank you, Mark, for that introduction. That’s not quite true, but it is a great introduction. So, thank you very much.

Mark Stiving

And hopefully the only part that wasn’t true was the driving on the wrong side of the road part.

Mark Peacock

Exactly.

Mark Stiving

Okay, good. Hey, how did you get into pricing?

Mark Peacock

I was in corporate life for 25 years. Lots of different roles in marketing, product management, sales, running a PNL, running a business. And so, I learned during my time, how important pricing was to business success. And when I left five and a half years ago now, and I was thinking about what I want to do next – and it took me a couple of months to work this out – But I eventually, have my eureka moment, which is pricing.

Nobody talks about pricing in the market that I wanted to work in, which in particular is small, medium sized businesses and entrepreneurs. There’s loads of marketing gurus, financial advisors, business coaches and so on, and they might touch on price, but nobody really specializing in understanding pricing strategy. So, I thought “That’s where I’m going to set my store at, I know a lot of things that I’ve learned in corporate life, and I’ve read a ton of books on the subject, so I’m going to help people with pricing. And it’s been great. It’s a very distinctive niche. And as you know, there’s a lot of value that we can add as pricing advisors. That’s why I do what I do.

Mark Stiving

Excellent. And so, then the big question, why did you write the book?

Mark Peacock

Why did I write the book? It’s a very good question.

I think I wrote the book for a couple of reasons. I guess the main one was to help get the word out there into the market to my audience in terms of what pricing can do and show people that actually, there are lots of different ways to think about pricing that aren’t necessarily difficult or complex that can make a real difference to their bottom line. To show the power pricing, basically, and as I’m a small business, I have myself and a few associates, but communicating that power pricing is not something that can be done easily. So, I thought, “Well, if I write a book and hopefully sell a few copies, that will get the word out much more easily, much quicker than I can do so myself.”

But secondly, I guess for my own benefit, to be seen as a thought leader and to help influence people that I speak to, the clients that I speak to in terms of them wanting to work with me. Those are the main reasons, I think.

Mark Stiving

I think that’s those are very good reasons, by the way, I love them. The second one is probably the most useful for you in the sense that people will recognize you as an expert because you have the book and they have a chance to read it.

I had a chance to skim through it. Thank you for sending me a previous review copy. I had a chance to skim it. I have to say, it’s really well-written. I didn’t read the whole thing, but I read some sections and what I liked about it is it wasn’t consultant-ish or business-ish. It was written in a way that people could understand it.

And so, now let’s talk about the book, because first off, I had to search for my name. Thank you so much for putting me in the acknowledgments. And you even put me ahead of Herman Simon in the acknowledgments. It’s like, “Wow, do I feel great?” He could be on the podcast now. Thank you. But tell me the seven steps. I’m actually sitting here looking at them. The book is titled “Pricing for Success: The Seven-Step Plan for Winning More Customers at Better Prices”. And you know that everybody who interviews you is going to say, what are the seven steps?

Mark Peacock

Yeah, exactly. I wanted to come up with a framework or a methodology or a model that people can use to help them think about pricing in a strategic sense. Because too often I think people think pricing is just a tactical question. You know, “What’s the price? How much should we charge?” And they don’t link it to the strategy of the business. So, thinking about your business strategically starts with, as a company, which is step number one: where do you want to go? Is your goal market share growth? Is it profit growth? Are you looking to seek investment to help you grow? Are you looking to exit your business? All of these questions might have a different bearing on the pricing strategy that you choose.

Mark Stiving

I want to pause you for just a second, if I may. I actually love that one, and I teach it when I teach my pricing class. But one of the examples I always love to use is what if your company says “Our goal is to raise ASPs?” Does that mean the only solution is we have to raise prices? And it turns out it doesn’t. What it does mean is that we start discounting a little bit more on things with higher ASPs and we discount less with things with lower ASPs. And overall, we can raise the overall company ASP without just raising company prices. So, I just thought that was a great example that says “Once you know, your company goals and objectives, you can make really smart pricing decisions.”

Mark Peacock

Exactly. And I think pricing, ultimately, is always a subset of business strategy, of your company goals. So, you’ve got to be clear. You got to know where you want to get to. Otherwise, you’ll end up floundering, I think, with your pricing. So that’s the first step.

Mark Stiving

Okay. Step two.

Mark Peacock

Second step is obviously, knowing what your customers think about you. What do they think about your products and services? What are their needs and wants in relation to what you can offer them? And roughly speaking, how much might they be willing to pay? And as you know, Mark, asking this price question, this willingness to pay question as early as possible and you’re planning and your new product development activities is really, really important. And it’s one that too often people leave right towards the end.

And then as part of that customer understanding, you can start to build a picture of different segments within your market. And we all know the traditional approach to market segmentation based on customer needs and wants, etc. A price segmentation is something people don’t tend to think about again, particularly in the small, medium sized world and entrepreneurs and startups. And actually, when you start to get your head around different levels of willingness to pay and grouping them into segments, you can get a new and very different picture about what pricing strategy, pricing model you can use in your business. So, it’s really powerful and it’s the best place to start in terms of pricing.

Mark Stiving

I think it is the hardest thing for companies to get their arms around. So, I tend to think of “We do price segmentation inside a market segment.” But when we start thinking about who’s willing to pay us more, what we usually realize is we haven’t defined our market segments properly. We haven’t figured out who’s trying to solve what problems and how do I put the right people together. And so, we tend to think, “Oh, these are small companies, these are mid-sized companies, these are big companies. And so, those are our market segments.” And it turns out that’s probably not the case. So that’s fascinating. And I agree completely. That’s super important and really hard to do.

Mark Peacock

Yeah. And then the next step is being aware of your competition. I term it “assessing value”. So, what are the alternatives that your customers, your buyers might consider other than what you do? What’s the product offering? How is it different? How is it better and how are they pricing? And of course, and also not just direct competitive alternatives, but also indirect alternatives. So, reference prices. If you’re trying to sell a CRM system, for example, is your buyer comparing you your product to Salesforce? Or are they comparing it to an HR system that they recently bought? What is the reference price that’s in their minds when they’re thinking about your offering? And then thinking about how to define your competitive advantage and linking that back to your pricing.

So, I think those are the first three steps, you know, as a company customer competitor, and that determines to a great extent your company strategy, your business strategy.

Mark Stiving

So, a couple of thoughts jump to mind. But the first one is one of my clients had the greatest example of the reference price that I’ve ever seen. And he was selling add-ons into Power BI. And it turns out, these add-ons are super powerful. But he knew that his max price, he could never charge more than Microsoft gets for Power BI. And so, he was limited at this $10 a month or whatever version the customer has. And it’s like even though it was way more powerful and worth way more than that, he was just limited at that because that’s what Microsoft charged.

Mark Peacock

Interesting. And there’s another great example. I think it’s the Michelin tires example. You probably know the story of Michelin came out with a new premium tire and they felt that the product was worth 20% more than their standard tire, but they didn’t think they could sell it at 20% more than the going rate. So, they changed the entire pricing model from a price per tire to a price per mile and ended up with an equivalent outcome of 20% increase in prices. But they wouldn’t have been able to do that using the traditional pricing approach. So, they completely changed their pricing model to get around the upper limit that people were thinking of the reference prices.

Mark Stiving

And that whole pricing model pricing metric conversation is a fascinating conversation. Maybe it’s in one of your last four steps.

Mark Peacock

So, the last four. The product. So, how do we define your product offering? And this is important because product and price are two sides of the same coin. When I buy products for a price, I want to know what I get as a customer and equally as a seller, you need to know everything that’s included in your product offering. And I think all too often, people aren’t clear enough in terms of their product offering. How do we define what’s in your product?

A product is just a bundle of features, right? Whether they are soft features, home features, or whatever they are. It’s just a combination of things that you offer a customer. And it also could include a product name, should have a price even if the price is free, and it hopefully has a purpose to me.

So, what is the product offering? And at this stage, we can then do a bit of toing and froing between the product section and the pricing section, because we can use pricing to change how we define our product offering to optimize the pricing. So, using things like tiered pricing, good, better, best bundling, the bundling product funnels, all of these tactics can help improve your final pricing strategy.

Mark Stiving

One of the things that I that I’ve come to realize – I’ve always thought of myself as a pricing expert – but I’ve come to realize that pricing and packaging go hand-in-hand. You just can’t separate the two. Now, maybe in the world of hardware, you make the packaging decision or the product decision upfront and then you figure out how much you’re going to charge for it. But when you start moving into software type things, we can move features from one package to another with a click of a mouse. So suddenly, these packaging decisions are fascinating. And when we understand customer’s willingness to pay or the value they get from these different features or packages, pricing helps us drive how we package our products.

Mark Peacock

Exactly

Mark Stiving

I think that’s amazing that you put that in there. Okay, now you can go to number five.

Mark Peacock

Yeah. So, number five is pricing, where we all want to get to this topic. But within that, what do I mean? I think there’s a whole series of things to address, but principally, it’s what pricing strategies are we going to use for our product offering in line with what our customers want from us and what they’re willing to pay and keeping an eye out from what the competition is doing?

So, pricing strategies. And in the book, I have a section or a table that describes 50 different pricing strategies. And the point of showing that table is to get people to realize that there’s lots of different ways to do pricing. If you can accept that there are thousands of different marketing strategies to help you grow your business, can you also accept that there are, well, maybe not thousands, but certainly hundreds of different ways to do pricing? Yet, too many people are stuck on cost plus margin pricing, competitive-based pricing or hourly rates or day rates, and they’re missing out on a plethora of other pricing strategies that are out there.

And within that, of course, and you touched on it a minute ago, what pricing metric are we going to use, what price range is, thinking from low to high, can we identify for our given market segments and our customers? And then how do we design a choice of prices so that we’re presenting the best possible set of pricing choices to our target market, to our customers to help them make the best possible choice for their needs?

So, that’s what I mean by pricing in that framework, that market.

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Mark Stiving

What do you think about having more than one pricing model for a product? And I’ll give you a quick example for buying a car. I can now buy a car, I can take a loan out for a car, I can lease a car, and in some cases I could subscribe to a car. And each one of those are different pricing models.

Mark Peacock

I have no issue with it. I think it’s fine as long as the owner of the product is clear what all of those different pricing models do and what their purposes. So presumably, they each are serving a slightly different segments of the market that they’re targeting, and there might be different levels of willingness to pay, and maybe there’s a slightly different cost structure, maybe. But I don’t have a problem with that. And I think again, in the book, some of the examples they’ve talked about with clients that I’ve worked with, where they’ve moved from a very simple pricing model, cost plus margin, to a new pricing strategy, which takes on three or four different elements, new elements to create a new pricing strategy, pricing model that’s unique to them.

So, I think as long as it’s carefully done, and isn’t overcomplicated to the individual buyer at the point of purchase or consideration is simplified in a way that it makes it easy for them to make a buying decision, then I’m okay with that.

Mark Stiving

Yeah, I think that’s the key. We have to be able to explain it and make it simple for the buyers to make a decision.

Mark Peacock

So, you’ve got that far in your pricing model. Then it comes into “How do we take it to the market? How do we present it to our customers, to our market?” So, that section number six is called “proposition”. Being clear on your value proposition, which for me is very simple, it’s what are the main reasons somebody might buy from you?

And then, in this section as well, I like to bring in some of the ideas from the psychology of pricing, which I know you know about, but I think many people don’t. Many businesses don’t understand the power of how to use price anchors, a decoy pricing, nudging, priming, all of these different techniques that convey that are actually quite simple to use. But once you get your head around how they work, they can be tremendously powerful in terms of how you present and propose your prices to your market, whether it’s on a website page, whether it’s in a brochure, whether it’s in a proposal document, or whether you’re just articulating it in a face-to-face conversation. All of these techniques can be very powerful in how we communicate the value of what we do and what we offer.

Mark Stiving

I think that’s a great way to put it. I often get into fun little disagreements with pricing people, and I make fun of behavioral economics. It’s important, but it only is important after you understand value, after you understand how customers are making these decisions. But yes, it really is important and I’m glad you included that.

Mark Peacock

Well, that’s why it’s on number six in my wheel, if you like. I like to use the examples from behavioral economics because they bring the subject of pricing alive, don’t they? Because people go, “Wow, that’s amazing”. You know, when you talk about price anchors and decoy pricing and things like that. But actually, in terms of implementing them, as you say, they should come towards the end of the cycle, once you’ve worked out the strategy completely right now.

Mark Stiving

What’s your favorite behavioral economics example? I’ll share mine after you do.

Mark Peacock

There’s a lot of classic ones, and Dan Ariely has named a few in his book. The classic example of The Economist Magazine and the decoy pricing and how without changing the actual prices, you can achieve a 40% increase in revenue by changing how you present the prices on a page. The use of the decoy price, the $125 price for print only access to the annual subscription of The Economist is a great example of that because it just shows people how counterintuitive pricing can be, because you’d never sit down and design that as a pricing menu, right? Because it just doesn’t make sense until you understand the psychology, how people are making a pricing decision when they look at that kind of menu. So, that’s always a factor that I use and talks more. How about you? What’s your favorite?

Mark Stiving

That is a good one. I like Richard Thaler. I’m going to give Richard Thaler credit. I think it was him who did this one, and it was the beer on the beach study where you would ask somebody, you and your friend were both at the beach and you say to your friend, “Hey, I’m going to run into this fancy resort and buy a beer. If it’s more than this, more than some number, I won’t buy it. What’s your topping number?” And so, they give you some number. And I can imagine me sitting here, it’s probably $10 or something like that, right? Somewhere in the ballpark. And then, imagine the exact same scenario where he says, “Hey, I’m going to run down to this corner convenience store and I’m going to buy a beer. What’s your top-end price for that? And it’s much less than $10. It’s probably $2 or $3. And there’s no difference if somebody handing you a beer on the beach. But it has everything to do with framing and what you believe, what your reference price would be on that one.

Mark Peacock

That’s a great example. I’m going to remember that one because it’s all about context, isn’t it? It is where the beer is sold from affecting your perception of value. Yeah, I really love that one.

Mark Stiving

And it’s about beer, so cool.

Mark Peacock

The other great beer example, just as an aside, is the power of price of selling high to low. So, there’s a study, I can’t remember who did it, but I quoted in my book. It’s a beer menu in a bar, and they show that beers list of 1 to 10, prices low to high, from top to bottom for the lowest price beers at the top, the highest price beers at the bottom, ranging from $5 to $10 a beer or whatever. And they did do an experiment where they just flip the prices around. So, the highest is at the top and the lowest is at the bottom. And what they found over a month-long trial or something was that for every beer sold, they achieved an average increase in selling price of about 4% just by flipping around the order in which the prices are shown. So, people are more likely to buy the more expensive beer just because the seen the higher prices first.

So, without changing the pricing, you can achieve an effective increase in prices of 4% by changing how you present the prices. And I think this whole question of how we present pricing is just as important as “what’s the number? What’s the strategy?” Because it makes such a difference.

Mark Stiving

Okay, now I have to make fun of you because it’s not just as important, it is important! But I make fun of all behavioral economics people.

Mark Peacock

You got me there.

Mark Stiving

 Go ahead, What’s number seven?

Mark Peacock

The seventh one is the final one. It’s “labeled profit”. But what I mean by that is achieving value. So, there’s no good in having done any of this great work going through stages 1 to 6, if you can’t take it to market and make it happen. So, this is typically with the businesses I’m working with where the sales teams or the people selling the products and services after the rubber hits the road and they have to take the product to market and they have to make it work. Just having a few basics in place. Having a clearly written pricing policy is such an important thing. And I literally say my book, “Write it down”. And it doesn’t have to be long, it doesn’t have to be complicated. One or two sides of A4, just write out what your company pricing strategy, pricing policy is. And if there’s a large number of people that need to know it, make sure they understand it; and it forms the backbone of your commercial strategy or business strategy.

So, being clear on your pricing policy, then knowing how to measure the impacts that pricing is making. Separating out price from revenue growth and volume growth, and making sure you target it and set your pricing objectives for 5% growth on price, 5% on volume, 3% reduction in cost, and work out what the impact makes on your bottom line. And there’s a number of other techniques I talk about in the book for how you can track it using waterfall charts and product volume, mix, variance analysis and things like that.

But I think, too often, businesses will just target revenue growth, which is a function of price and volume, and they don’t break it down any further than that. Say we want to achieve 20% revenue growth next year. What is that, 20% of volume, or 10% of price, and 10% of volume or what? So, being more clear on the price growth that you’re looking to achieve.

So, ultimately, that’s where we get to, Mark. I think if you follow all of those steps, you’ll be in a very good place and have a very good pricing policy.

Mark Stiving

That sounds like a morning’s work. Sounds like a huge job. I want to push back or ask your perception on the last thing you said. And one of the things that I always find fascinating is companies – I got I’m going to tie a whole bunch of things together at once – sometimes we want to do outcome-based pricing. So, “Did we generate more revenue? Did we generate more profits or whatever happens to be?” And I always advise against that. And the key reason advise against that is because as soon as an outcome happens, there are three or four or five different departments in a company who says, “Yeah, we did that”. So, when prices go up, right? So average selling prices go up. We in pricing, we’re like, “Oh yeah, we did that”. And sales says, “No, no, no, no, we sold value better and negotiated better. That was actually us who did it”. And marketing says, “No, no, no, no, no. That was us finding the right clients to bring in people who had higher value. They had our products more and that was really us who did it.” It’s really hard to say “That’s pricing”. How would you address that?

Mark Peacock

Yeah, that’s a great example, I think, Mark. And of course, all of those departments have had a bearing on an influence on the net selling price, the average selling prices achieved. I guess the point I was trying to make and I am trying to make in my book is that I would much rather companies were more focused on where they think they want price to get, where they want it to get to in terms of their business plan. And too often, not enough attention is paid on that. So, when I’m saying that, I don’t really care who’s taking the credit for it, whether it’s marketing, sales or the pricing team. I just want the business to be more focused on how are we going to grow our business. And growth is simply a function of the number of customers and the number of products they buy and the prices that they’re willing to pay. What is the growth plan? How are we going to get there? How many customers do we need? How many products do we want to sell and at what price?

How we implement that then falls down to the functional teams, whether it’s pricing department, sales departments, and marketing departments. And generally, in the types of businesses I work with small to medium size businesses, they don’t have a pricing department. So, it generally sits with sales, marketing, maybe a bit of operations and even a bit of finance sometimes. So, getting people to buy in to the pricing policy at a companywide level, which is everything that I talked about before that. The strategies, the product offering, understanding customers, knowing where we want to go, is really important. Getting that engagement so that everybody’s on board with the whole strategy. And I think if we can achieve that, the rest will flush itself out through the course of the year.

But I take your point, Mark, in terms of who takes the credit. I’m not sure. I wouldn’t want to be judging that at the end of the year in terms of who made the best contributions price improvement. I think as long as we know where we want to go and we can measure how whether or not we’re going to get there, that’s good enough for me.

Mark Stiving

I think that’s a great way to put it. “Let’s do this in a forward-looking manner.” Then when it comes to a backwards looking manner, we just say, “Look, it’s a team sport. We all did it.”

Mark Peacock

Yeah, exactly. It’s important to take the learnings, I think, from “How can we do better?”, whether it’s not the marketing, creating the brand and the customer demand, the sales people in their effectiveness and so on. But yeah, pricing is such a multi-function sport, multi-function discipline that everybody has to know what can they play in that process, I think.

Mark Stiving

Okay, Mark, you wrote this big long book, but I’m going to have to ask you this really, really simple question: What’s the one piece of pricing advice you’d give our listeners that you think could have a big impact on their business?

Mark Peacock

Put your prices up.

Mark Stiving

Oh, I love that. Yes. Raise your prices, especially right now, because everybody expects you to raise prices. So, it’s a really good opportunity.

Mark Peacock

When I started five years ago, Mark, the banging the drum on the need to raise prices was a lot harder, as you will remember. But in the current economic environment, with high inflation both in Europe and the states, businesses are more accepting of the need to raise prices. They don’t like it any more than they used to, but they are more accepting of it. So, take the time to do your pricing strategy properly. Put your prices up because it is the most powerful lever you can use to increase profitable growth.

Mark Stiving

Yeah, absolutely. And if you do it smart and communicate it well, your market’s going to accept it and you’re going to be a much more profitable company.

Mark Peacock

Exactly.

Mark Stiving

Excellent. Mark, thank you so much for your time today. If anybody wants to contact you, how can they do that?

Mark Peacock

Best way to find me is on my website, which is www.pricemaker.co.uk. Or you can find me on LinkedIn. Mark Peacock, the pricing coach.

Mark Stiving

Perfect. And we’ll have some of those links on the show notes so it be easy to find.

And to our listeners, thank you so much for your time today. If you enjoyed this, please leave us a rating and a review. The easiest way is to go to ratethispodcast.com/impactpricing and they will guide you through the process. And speaking of reviews, Andrew Jenkins left an Amazon review on my latest book, Selling Value: How to Win More Deals at Higher Prices. Andrew said:

“Brilliant. I’ve been in sales for 30 years and I love this book. I’ve also never written an Amazon review. The book examines the power of selling value in a way that is easy to digest but powerful at the same time. For example, the principles around on which one are what we do every day, and yet they’re fundamental in the sales process. I’ve always believed the price is not an objection if the buyer places value on what’s being offered. However, the person selling need to achieve this often in competition and with a product in a busy marketplace. Mark helps navigate these issues on a clear and logical way for anyone already experienced in sales or just starting out. Selling value is a must read.”

All I can say is, Thank you, Andrew. I really appreciate that.

And finally, if you have any questions or comments about this podcast or pricing in general, feel free to email me at mailto:mark@impactpricing.com. Now go make an impact.

Mark Stiving

Don’t forget to attend our workshop. “How to Fearlessly Raise Prices Now” go to impactpricing.com/rpn.

 

Tags: Accelerate Your Subscription Business, ask a pricing expert, pricing metrics, pricing strategy

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