Ep94: Powerful Pricing Insights from a Subscription Expert with Robbie Kellman Baxter

Robbie Kellman Baxter is a Strategy consultant helping companies develop and optimize membership models and subscription pricing. Deep expertise in subscription-based and SaaS businesses and the Membership Economy. 

Her specialties include Growth strategy, market assessment, market segmentation, the establishment of metrics, product and business planning, consumer services, premium services strategy, online services, recurring revenue, customer acquisition, customer loyalty, product marketing, social networking for the enterprise.  

In this episode, Robbie talks about the need to focus on the long-term value you are creating to have a bigger share in the pricing pie. With everyone she meets talking about their ‘cancel stories,’ she shares how hiding cancel buttons can negatively impact one’s branding in the long run. She highlights how one can use subscriptions strategically to build a deeper relationship with customers.

 

Why you have to check out today’s podcast:

  • Find out the key factor when considering a subscription pricing model 
  • Find out how to optimize tiered pricing options with subscription 
  • Learn how to make your subscription model so compelling that customers stay forever 

 

“Subscription is just a pricing tactic. And it can be used in many ways.” 

– Robbie Kellman Baxter 

 

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Topics Covered:

00:40 – How she got into subscription 

01:39 – Her experience working with Netflix 

02:18 – Why does she love subscription so much 

03:38 – What there has to be trust and relationship in a subscription model 

05:33 – What does she think about ‘Keep it Simple.’ 

08:45 – Tiers come later 

11:06 – What it means to create a lot of value and to get a reasonable share of that value 

13:41 – How do you learn from your customers where to go next and what additional tiers to add? 

16:01 – Thoughts on a minimum viable product 

16:41 – The impact of hiding cancel buttons 

19:28 – Why is it so wrong to be making cancellations difficult 

21:26 – How subscriptions can be used in many ways 

24:54 – Amazon Prime as an example of a subscription pricing tactic 

27:14 – Creating more value 

 

Key Takeaways:

“Subscriptions really tie into human behavior. One of the things I always advise organizations that come to me saying we want to have subscription pricing, is, take a step back and make sure that you have a relationship with your customer that justifies subscription pricing.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“It’s only after establishing that trusted long-term relationship that you can justify the subscription pricing.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“For me, if I’m going to buy a continuous stream of benefits, I need to trust that that stream of benefits is going to continue because I am turning off my consumer brain when I sign up for a subscription.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“What I’ve noticed is, the more complex the pricing, the more difficult the decision for the buyer. And so, you’re always balancing that trade-off. And if you want to go back to that, that concept of turning off your consumer brain and trusting the company, it’s really hard to turn off your consumer brain when the consumption is so complex.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“I wish companies would focus more on how to create more value because then it’s easier to raise your prices if you’re creating more value.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“With subscriptions, and I think with pricing, in general, people often know just enough to be dangerous.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“Hiding the cancel button leaves such a bad taste in someone’s mouth that they’re never going to come back to you.”  – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

I find that a really tough point of view to hold if you’re going to be a trusted source and you’re going to take advantage of the trust that you’re getting to raise your prices and hope that the customer doesn’t notice.” – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

“Every once in a while, take a step back and focus on the long-term value that you’re creating them and say, ‘How can I layer in more value to justify a bigger share of the pricing pie?’ – Robbie Kellman Baxter 

 

Resources / People Mentioned: 

 

Connect with Robbie Kellman Baxter:

 

Connect with Mark Stiving:   

  • Email: mark@impactpricing.com
  • LinkedIn

 

Full Interview Transcript  

(Note: This transcript was created with an AI transcription service. Please forgive any transcription or grammatical errors. We probably sounded better in real life.) 

Mark Stiving   

Welcome to Impact Pricing, the podcast where we discuss pricing, value, and the high-level relationship between them. I’m Mark Stiving, today our guest is Robbie Kellman Baxter. Here are three things you want to know about Robbie before we start. First, she is not a pricing expert. She’s a subscription expert. She just wrote a new book, ‘The Forever Transaction: How to Build a Subscription Model So Compelling, Your Customers Will Never Want to Leave.’ Great title. And she has a new podcast, Subscription Stories: True Tales from the Trenches. Welcome, Robbie. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Oh, thanks for having me, Mark. 

Mark Stiving   

How did you get into subscriptions in the first place? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Well, about 20 years ago, I got laid off while I was on maternity leave, and decided to hang out my own shingle as a consultant. And if you want to be successful as a consultant, you really need to have an area of expertise and focus. So, I was kind of on the lookout for something beyond: I’d come out of a strategic product marketing kind of world, I’d worked at Booz Allen and several tech companies in what’s come to be called Subscription as a Service. And my fifth client, after I hung out my shingle was Netflix, and I fell in love with their business model and said, I’m going to follow this thread and learn as much as I can about what they’re doing right, and what’s applicable to other organizations. And that was really kind of my starting point in the world of subscriptions. 

Mark Stiving   

That’s pretty fascinating. Do you still work with Netflix? I’m sure you don’t have to answer. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

No, I am not working with Netflix right now. And in fact, the time that I worked with them they were just building out their national footprint in the United States if you can remember back to that. So, they were still three DVDs out at a time. And they were just putting into place all of the warehouses to send those DVDs everywhere in the country so that you could do a three-day turnaround, which was their promise at the time. 

Mark Stiving   

I tell you what, I loved those DVDs. That was just the best business model ever.  

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

So true.  

Mark Stiving   

Oh, my gosh! So, what is it about subscriptions that keep you in the field? Why do you love this so much? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

I love it. You know, I’ve always been a people person, really interested in building connections with different kinds of people. And my sister is a psychologist. And that was a path that I might have taken. And subscriptions really ties into human behavior. One of the things I always advise organizations that come to me saying we want to have subscription pricing is: take a step back and make sure that you have a relationship with your customer that justifies subscription pricing. Because in the way that I look at subscriptions, it’s all about that membership mindset, it’s about the way the organization thinks about their obligation to the customer very much about the long term. And it’s only after establishing that trusted long-term relationship, that you can justify the subscription pricing. So that’s the part I really love, is, what is going to justify the long-term relationship. And how do you keep proving that? 

Mark Stiving   

I think that’s spot on. I don’t usually use the word relationship when I talk about it. But what I do say is, look, buyers want to buy a continuous stream of benefits. And that means not, let me just go buy a product and I now own it. And if you think about it, that continuous stream of benefits is a lot like a relationship. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, and I would say, it’s really interesting that you make that distinction. For me, if I’m going to buy a continuous stream of benefits, I need to trust that stream of benefits is going to continue, because I am turning off my consumer brain when I sign up for a subscription. And so, trust has to be there and our relationship has to be there. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, first of all, I agree with what you just said. But secondly, I want to take something that you just said and tie it to pricing before we jump into a pricing conversation. That is, I’m going to turn off my consumer’s brain. And what you just said was, I’m going to pay you your monthly fee month after month after month, and I’m going to stop making decisions. I’m just going to write you a check or let you take money out of my credit card. And that is what we call a ‘will I decision’. And it’s an incredible place for companies to be which is one of the reasons why subscriptions are so successful. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, absolutely. A ‘will I decision’. I’m going to start using that. I love it. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, it’s just so you know, I teach ‘will I’ on which one and when people don’t compare us to a competitor. It’s just a ‘will I decision’ and they’re less price sensitive. So, feel free. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Great. 

Mark Stiving   

Now in the intro, Robbie, I said that I’ll bet it upset you. I said you’re not a pricing expert. But what I’ll also say then is that you just wrote a new article or a new blog called ’10 Tips about Subscription Pricing’. And rarely do I see articles from non-pricing experts that I say, ‘Wow, that was really well done!’ So, Robbie, can I say that was really well done! 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Oh, you made my day. Thank you. 

Mark Stiving   

Let’s jump into a few of these, just for fun, because they’re all fun. They’re all great. But let’s start with keep it simple. What do you think about keeping it simple? And boy, I got a kazillion thoughts on that! 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

There are so many subscription pricing, there’s so many tools now for pricing, let’s just put it that way. There are so many tools, there’s so much sophistication around pricing. And I see companies, it’s almost like when you get your Crayola box of crayons, when you’re a kid, and you’re like, there’s 64 colors, and I’m going to use every single one of them in this picture. Like I want to have an addon, I want to charge for usage, I want to charge for features, I want to charge for volume, I want to charge for support, I want to charge so many different ways that you can price that they want to do all of them. And what I’ve noticed is the more complex the pricing, the more difficult the decision for the buyer. You’re always balancing that tradeoff. And if you want to go back to that, that concept of turning off your consumer‘s brain and trusting the company, it’s really hard to turn off your consumer brain when the consumption is so complex. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, I think that’s absolutely spot on. I often say the words confused buyers don’t buy. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, I agree. Totally. 

Mark Stiving   

So, Robbie, I love what you just said. But in a lot of ways, it’s interesting because I’m working with a client right now, where they’ve got this great attitude of, I want to do value-based pricing, I want to do price segmentation, I want to get the most I can from each individual customer. But with that attitude, they’re trying to complicate the pricing so much that it’s going to be hard to sell or hard for buyers to buy, we have to find this happy medium between how do I get the most from each individual buyer? And how do I create a simple pricing model that most of my market understands and is willing to engage us with? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, it’s definitely about finding the balance. And a lot of times at least when I look at it with what I do, the company is worried about consumption, they’re worried what if this company, this customer, this individual gets more value than this other individual? I should be able to realize my fair share of that value, I should be able to capture my fair share of that higher value. And at some point, I think you have to be okay with not getting every penny on the table. But at the same time, you do want to understand what your own costs are going to be. And also, how your various segments of customers value what you’re offering so that you can come up with a kind of the simplest way to maximize your recognition of that value that you’re creating. I wish companies focus more on how do I create more value? Because then it’s easier to raise your prices if you’re creating more value. 

Mark Stiving   

Can I say, preach to that one? Oh, my goodness gracious. If companies would create more value this life, first off have to understand what value means to the marketplace? But absolutely. Let’s pick it up. By the way, if you remember the 10 that you wrote, pick anyone that you want. And if not, I’ll pick another one. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, pick another one. This is fun! 

Mark Stiving   

Okay, let’s do ‘tiers come later’. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

It kind of goes back to the ‘keep it simple’. You know, with subscriptions, and I think with pricing, in general, people often know just enough to be dangerous. And, most people that go to business school, or even that read the business press know that if you have three options, the customer is probably going to pick the middle option most of the time. There’s this feeling that we need to have three options. And then you tie that in with the idea that we just discussed, you want to get every penny on the table, you want to recognize all the value for the different segments. And suddenly, I have brand new companies that have zero customers that are already talking about three tiers of pricing, plus five add-ons, plus kind of a hierarchy or a grid-based on volume. And that’s a bad idea for a bunch of reasons. One is what we just talked about that it’s too complex for the customer, but it’s also really noisy for the company. Because if things are working or aren’t working well, it’s very hard to tease out what’s going on. And it’s very hard to figure out what’s the next feature I should build? What’s the next offering I should create? What do I want to do more of unless of? Because there’s so much noise. 

Mark Stiving   

I think that is such a brilliant observation. And if we go back, that extra has a lot to do with what we just talked about, in that, some people are thinking, yeah, but that buyer is getting so much more value than they’re paying me for. And to put that to bed for a second. Imagine that you and I both bought Microsoft Word, not the subscription, we bought a physical copy of Microsoft Word. And I used it to write a letter to my wife, and you used it to write a best-selling book, which one of us got more value? And how much did Microsoft get paid? Right, they got paid the same, regardless of how we use their product. Just because we’re in subscriptions doesn’t mean that we have to capture every single dime of value. Love the attitude. But boy, if it’s going to make us make stupid decisions, we have to let go of that somehow. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, I think that’s right. And what I always say to my clients is focus on creating a lot of value, and getting a reasonable share of that value. And if you’re creating a lot of value, the pie is very big, and there’s plenty to go around. And even if that letter that you wrote, made your girlfriend into a wife, and changed your life forever, or that book that I wrote, became a bestseller. Or if the letter was lost in the mail, and nobody ever read my bookthere’s still value being created. And that’s what I want companies to focus on. The other thing that you bring up that I think is really important is that there’s so many different ways to assess value. So, I wrote more words, most likely, if I wrote a book and you wrote a letter unless your love letter looked more like a book, and my book looked more like an eBook. But for the most partthey could charge by the letter, right? The number of letters that we use, the number of characters we used. And we both know that that’s not the value. But a lot of organizations charge based on their own product, the way they define their own product, instead of charging on what is the impact on that customer’s journey. I think a lot of companies talk about the customer journey, but what they mean is the moments when the customer touches their product, which for most customers is not the journey, right? If I buy a white blouse to wear to give a presentation, my journey is not buying the blouse, putting on the blouse, fixing the color of the blouse, doing the buttons of the blouse. My journey is I’m trying to be a professional speaker, I’m trying to make a good impression on the people I’m speaking in front of. And that white blouse is like a tiny, tiny part of my journey. And by the way, if that clothing company wants to have a bigger part in my journey and create more value and get more money from me, they could think about helping me look great on stage, instead of optimizing the blouse. 

Mark Stiving   

I got it, spot on. I don’t want to give up on ‘tiers come later’ yet, because another thing that you said, which I took is absolutely brilliant, is, if you’re a startup company, or if you’re building a product for the first time, build a single simple product and go out and prove your market product fit. And then you can start figuring out how am I going to build this into good, better best packaging? Or how do I make this better? So, I thought that was incredibly brilliant and insightful. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Oh, well thank you. And I think that if you have one product, you get really clear data back. So, go for that first tier that you introduce should be the one that you’re most confident people are going to sign up for, and stick around on an ongoing basis and keep paying for. So, as you said, you want to have productmarket fit. And a lot of times product people when they think about productmarket fit, they’re really focusing on the headline benefit, getting somebody to sign up, getting somebody to make that first payment. In the world of subscriptions, you’re probably losing money if they only stay for a month or they only stay for a period. So, it’s really important to productmarket fit that those first customers not only do they sign up, but that they stay for several periods for several months that they keep paying you. And once you know that you can start thinking about what segments of my market I am not reaching right now because this bundle isn’t quite right. And how can I introduce another tier to attract another segment of my audience, or the other way to add a tier is of this current group that is loving my product where I have really good productmarket fit? Are they willing to pay more? For more stuff? Are they pushing at the limits of this product and saying, ‘How come you can’t do this? or How come I can’t do that, or I wish you had this feature or this service?’ And that’s how you learn from your customers where to go next, what additional tiers to add, and the likelihood of those two additional tiers. Being successful goes way up if you build them based on feedback from that first tier. 

Mark Stiving   

I’m not sure how much you know about development, software development. But in agile, in the whole software development world nowadays, we constantly hear about a minimum viable product. Doesn’t make a ton of sense to make your MVP a product that you put out, and you try to sell it and you get feedback on it. And you learn that people are actually going to keep buying it and keep using it. And then we figure out how we tweak it, adjust it and add to it to make it better? Just seems obvious? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, absolutely. It’s very hard to make the case that your MVP is three tiers, right? You can’t get more minimum than three. Anybody’s done first grade Math knows, you can get more minimum than three products. Like how about one product for a minimum viable product? 

Mark Stiving   

Yes, exactly. Exactly. Okay, there’s one of the 10 that you have up here that gives me a negative visceral reaction, not because of what you wrote, but because of an experience with a vendor. And that is hiding the cancel button will cost you in the long term. I’m going to leave that to you before I tell the story that I hate. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

First of all, when I tell people that I’m a subscription expert, I get cancelled stories, like almost 100% of the time I say I do subscription; I’m at a cocktail party, or I’m on an airplane back in the days when we were on airplanes. And I say I do subscription work. And they say, let me tell you about when I tried to cancel my newspaper, let me tell you when I tried to cancel my gym membership, let me tell you when I tried to cancel my cable. And it’s really interesting. Especially because you’re a pricing expert, one of the things I hear over and over again, is we are maximizing our, Robbie, you always say maximize lifetime customer value the way that we have been most powerful at maximizing lifetime value is by adding more screens to our cancel flow. In other words, it used to take you three steps to cancel and now it takes six steps to cancel. Or we’ve added three months of revenue to our average lifetime customer value, by requiring people to call us to cancel. And by only having the phones open Monday through Thursday, 11 to Eastern time. There’s a couple of things it does, number one: it dramatically reduces trust. And a big part of subscription success is that people can leave and come back. Lots of people do that. You cancel your Netflix and you come back three months later. You cancel your newspaper. And when you go on vacationwhat have you, best practice is moving to having a pause button, which allows people to really easily pause their subscription, not lose their data, not lose their setup, and come back when they’re ready. Hiding the cancel button leaves such a bad taste in someone’s mouth that they’re never going to come back to you, number one. Number two: they’re going to spread the rumor around to their friends that it’s really hard to cancel with you. And so, it’s going to have an impact on your brand equity, and on your ability to attract new customers as well. And it’s unethical, I’ll just say that it’s unethical. Who wants to get up in the morning? 

Mark Stiving   

That resonated so well with me. And I’m afraid to tell my cancel story because you said everybody tells you a cancel story. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Now bring it on, bring it on! 

Mark Stiving   

So, mine I think is super valuable. And maybe they’ve changed. I don’t know. But it’s the Wall Street Journal. I would love to re-subscribe to The Wall Street Journal. But I despise the way that I had to go through canceling the last time that I’m never going to do it again. And I think it’s exactly what you just saibecause I think I had to call them in order to get a cancellation or to cancel my subscription. And that just seems so wrong. In so many ways. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

It’s so wrong. And what’s interesting is newspapers; the whole point of newspapers is they’re our trusted source for information, right? Newspapers help us understand the world around us so we can make better decisions in our own lives. And the fact that newspapers and not just the Wall Street Journal says a lot of newspapers are guilty of this, make it very hard to cancel. And something that, as you pointed out at the beginning, I’m not a pricing expert and something that I find really puzzling, is that Netflix is usually considered the standardbearer for all things subscription, and particularly for pricing. They have very simple pricing, right? I think they, right now, have three options. It’s all monthly, there’s no annual, you can cancel it anytime. There’s no other stuff bundled in with it. And all these newspapers have a million bundles, and a million deals and a lot of them give you really, really tremendously great introductory pricing, and then dramatically raise the price like 100%, at some point, and the argument I’ve heard them say is, by that point, they’re not really our loyal readers, they aren’t looking at our pricing anymore, they’re not really paying attention. And to me, this gets back to the consumer‘s brain goes off, I find that a really tough, tough point of view to hold if you’re going to be a trusted source and you’re going to take advantage of the trust that you’re getting to raise your prices and hope that the customer doesn’t notice. 

Mark Stiving 

Yeah, I agree completely. Let’s pick another one, just so we can end on a high note instead of having…The second one you put in, I found really fast, I found them all really interesting. But subscriptions can serve many functions, price accordingly. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah. So, you know, right now, everybody has a subscription, right? You can subscribe to Burger King, you can subscribe to Caterpillar for your heavy equipment, you can subscribe to 1000 different streaming content providers, you can subscribe to your toothpaste, to your toothbrush, everything. And so, a lot of organizations are saying right now, we need to have subscriptions. But saying we need to have subscriptions is like saying we need to use email. It’s like, yeah, use email. But are you using it to send a customized, confidential message to a colleague? Or are you using it for marketing, or is the product the newsletter itself? And it’s the same thing with subscriptions. With Netflix, for example, the subscription is the product, that’s how they make their money. But with Apple, Apple plus, their content is only one piece of how they make their money. And it’s okay for them to lose some money on their content because it’s a marketing tool. So, subscriptions can be the product itself, they can be your source, primary source of revenue and profitability. They can be an introduction, a way to get to know an organization before you make a really big expenditure, which is something for example, that Porsche is doing the car company, you can subscribe to their fleet of cars. And have a Cayenne during the week and a turbo Carrera on the weekend; drive your sports car around on the weekend and have your big SUV during the week. And what they found is the people that liked that subscription are people who’ve never bought a car before or never bought a Porsche before. So, it’s a lightweight way to introduce themselves to the Porsche family. And then the third way, subscriptions can be used as a way of deepening a relationship in a highly episodic or transactional business. A really good example of that is the one that I featured in my podcast last week is Bain and Company, the consulting firm. Their consulting engagements can cost, seven figures to $2/$3 million. And then the company might go dark for a year or two, and then by another big engagement. One of the things that they created is their net promoter loyalty forum, the NPS loyalty forum for the senior customerfacing employees of their client companies and their prospective client companies. And those leaders gather periodically, and they pay a fee. But it’s a six-figure fee, not a seven-figure fee for the year to access all of this content to get to know one another under the Bain umbrella. So, the forum actually serves to deepen the relationships and smooth out the lumpiness of this highly transactional episodic revenue. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, that’s pretty fascinating. If I could interpret what I just heard you say, I would have said I would interpret it as you can treat your subscriptions strategically. It doesn’t just have to be the product. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yeah, absolutely. That is well summarized. Subscription is a tactic. It’s just a pricing tactic. And it can be used in many ways. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, the one that I think about a lot is Amazon Prime. Because Amazon doesn’t have Prime to make money on Prime. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yes, Amazon Prime is a really interesting example. Most people are familiar with it. As a free shipping for $89 a year, $99 a year or $199 a year, whatever it was when you bought it, when you first signed up, and it gives you free shipping. And that free shipping was enough to change your behavior and make you go to Amazon first when you buy whatever it is you’re going to buy. But since then they’ve used it almost as a Trojan horse, to introduce prime subscribers to other services that Amazon provides. Like, their music, their video, their storage, deepening the relationship with Amazon and increasing the likelihood that a bigger amount of your spend is going to go to Amazon. So, it’s really interesting to look at Amazon and what they’ve done with their subscription on their journey. They’re forever promised to their customer, what they really want to do is remove all friction from all buying processes. And you know, if you remember 20 years ago, that was you could buy books, you could buy books, and wait two weeks for them to be shipped. Today, it means you can buy anything, and it arrives pretty much the next day. And maybe at some point in the future, all you have to do is think about a cute pair of shoes that you want to buy and they appear on your feet. They’re not quite there yet, but they have asked for my house key already. And they are well on their way. 

Mark Stiving   

Nice. And if you think about what you just said, you just said that Amazon is using a subscription strategically to build a deeper relationship with their customers. 

Robbie Kellman Baxter  

Yes, absolutely! 

Mark Stiving   

Absolutely. That was brilliant. Robbie, I think I could do this all day long. But we’re going to have to call this off. But I have to end with the question I always do. What’s one piece of pricing advice you would give our listeners that you think could have a big impact on their business? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter 

Every once in a while, take a step back and focus on the long-term value that you’re creating them and say, ‘How can I layer in more value to justify a bigger share of the pricing pie?’ 

Mark Stiving   

Nice. And I think you said that earlier today by saying create more value? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Yes, with the pricing people that I’ve worked with who are fantastic, I think one of the challenges that they sometimes face is they know too much. They know too much about all of the levers of pricing. And it’s tempting to really dig in on pricing optimization in that way. And so much value can be obtained by just taking a step back and saying, what is the value we’re creating? And is it easier for us to optimize for that last penny on the table, or to expand the pie, and create a lot more? And I think that that can be really, really powerful to just look through a different lens every now and then. 

Mark Stiving   

I think I got to say, Robbie, in all honesty, that was absolutely genius. I say that a lot. But I’ve never heard it said, ‘Do you want to try to optimize your price for your current product? Or do you want to truly understand value so that you can create, communicate, and capture more value in the future? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

Oh, I like how you said that. This is great, I am enjoying our conversation so much and really provocative, probing all kinds of new ideas and thoughts for me. So, thank you so much for having me. 

Mark Stiving   

Well, it’s certainly our pleasure. And thank you for your time today. If anybody wants to contact you, how can they do that? 

Robbie Kellman Baxter   

They can find me on LinkedIn. And they can find me on my website, which is my name RobbieKellmanBaxter.com.  

Mark Stiving   

Perfect! And to our listeners, would you please leave us a review? We recently got one by Zolly125. This one wasn’t so recent, but I haven’t read it yet. Zolly125 says, Excellent podcast!  

I really like how the host has a not above reproach attitude to pricing. I find that lots of folks will tell you that they have all of the answers, but the host is not a solutionizer. It seems like I get a nugget of wisdom out of each episode.” 

Thank you, Zolly, and I hope you got a nugget out of this one as well. Please don’t forget to join our community at championsofvalue.com. It’s our free community. That’s where you’ll find all of the free content that I put out, memes, blogs, videos, podcasts. You get them there at community.championsofvalue.com. If you have any questions or comments about the podcast or pricing in general, feel free to email me mark@impactpricing.com. Now, go make an impact!

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