Impact Pricing Podcast

Ep137: Setting Prices Using the World’s Best Buyer Persona with Stormie Andrews

 

Stormie Andrews is the president of Yokel Local. He is a licensed practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), an award-winning author, Forbes contributor, HubSpot contributor, recognized buyer persona expert, and HubSpot Certified Trainer. He has also been recognized as a Member of the Year from the American Marketing Association, named as a Top 50 Tech Visionary, and his book, “The World’s Best Buyer Persona® System,” became an Amazon Hot New Releases Best Seller.

In this episode, Stormie talks about how the World’s Best Buyer Persona System helps users set them apart from competitors in terms of market positioning where pricing doesn’t have to be one driver.

Why you have to check out today’s podcast:

  • Find out how to create the next best thing in creating your best buyer persona in the absence of the gold standard
  • Learn how to create a value proposition where pricing isn’t the number one driver
  • Find out the concept of TINB (There Is No B) in the World’s Best Buyer Persona System

              

It’s not about you. It’s not about your goods and services. It’s about your prospects, your ideal customers, their pain points, their issues. The more time, energy, and effort you put into that, the more in alignment you’re going to be as it pertains to your pricing. 

Stormie Andrews

           

Topics Covered:

01:53 – How he started getting into personas

03:20 – Differentiating sales and marketing

07:02 – Creating multiple personas for each buyer type and making recommendations

07:52 – The next best thing to do when you don’t meet the gold standard to help you create the best buyer persona

09:55 – Using Maslow’s hierarchy of needs as a basis for creating personas

14:01 – How does a buyer persona influences pricing

17:34 – Building personas for different decision makers

21:28 – What could be the CFO’s TINB for a certain product

22:23 – Putting a TINB for a buyer persona

25:50 – The belief systems that are addressed in the World’s Best Buyer Persona

27:15 – Stormie’s pricing advice that can have a great impact on one’s business

         

Key Takeaways: 

“As we go through that exercise, we can spend an entire day just on positioning factors, because we have to have unique positioning factors that are designed to resonate with someone, not everyone. And if we can align those positioning factors, put them in alignment with the belief systems, the motivations of their ideal prospects, they’re going to be in better shape.” – Stormie Andrews

“When we get into that positioning in the marketplace, we can find that market gap that sets the users of the ‘world’s best buyer persona’ that sets them apart from their competitors, they market on that unique positioning that they have within the market. And that becomes their value proposition that can become their TINB (There Is No B), where pricing isn’t the number one driver.” – Stormie Andrews

“What if we build a persona where we build resources for the initial influencer, and then we create and build a packet that they can download and give to the CFO that addresses their problems, their issues, their concerns, their motivations. That makes the world or at least that it’s designed to speed up the sales process and make for a much smoother sales process.” – Stormie Andrews

             

Connect with Stormie Andrews:

              

Connect with Mark Stiving:   

                          

Full Interview Transcript

(Note: This transcript was created with an AI transcription service. Please forgive any transcription or grammatical errors. We probably sounded better in real life.)

Stormie Andrews 

It’s not about you. It’s not about your goods and services. It’s about your prospects, your ideal customers, their pain points, their issues. The more time, energy, and effort you put into that, the more in alignment you’re going to be as it pertains to your pricing.

[Intro]

Mark Stiving 

Today’s podcast is sponsored by Jennings Executive Search. I had a great conversation with John Jennings about the skills needed in different pricing roles. He and I think a lot alike. If you’re looking for a new pricing role, or if you’re trying to hire just the right pricing person, I strongly suggest you reach out to Jennings Executive Search. They specialize in placing pricing people, say that three times fast.

Mark Stiving

Welcome to Impact Pricing, the podcast where we discuss pricing, value, and the individual relationship between them. I’m Mark Stiving; today, our guest is Stormie Andrews, and here are three things you will learn about Stormie before we start. He is the president of Yokel Local Internet Marketing. He hosts two different podcasts, PowerHouse Experts and Finances the Other “F” Word. And the reason he’s here today is because he is the creator of the World’s Best Buyer Persona. Welcome, Stormie.

Stormie Andrews  

Thanks, Mark. I’m glad to be here with you.

Mark Stiving  

It’s going to be fun. And I often find really great aha moments come when we’re combining different topics. So, today we’re going to explore with you personas. And with me, pricing, and let’s see what we can come up with.

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely, this would be a blast. Been on lots of podcasts. And I’ve been looking forward to this one. So, this is too cool. Good.

Mark Stiving 

How did you get into personas?

Stormie Andrews 

You know, it’s interesting, it really started when I was in third grade. Oddly enough, when I was a kid, my dad worked for the government. So, we moved all over all around the country. And it wasn’t until my junior and senior years in high school that I experienced what it was like to attend the same school two years in a row. Some school years, two or three schools, lots of moving, that’s what I wanted to get to. But as we moved around the country, I moved into a wide variety of communities and a wide variety of neighborhoods. Some of the community’s education was valued, some toughness was valued. So, I had to gauge who I was speaking with relatively quickly, and I thought it was a survival mechanism. So, I’ve been paying lots of attention to people that led to an incredible sales career because when I accidentally landed into sales, I was pretty darn good at it. Whatever company I worked at, whatever the industry was, I naturally rose to the top or became the top salesperson within the company purely because I could connect with people and understand their viewpoint where they were coming from. And eventually, it led to personas. So, I like to say that I’ve been dealing with personas longer than anyone on the planet.

Mark Stiving 

So that makes sense because you had to read your audience really fast, and who it is I’m going to talk with. But I think reading people as a salesperson is different from sitting down and thinking about and documenting what a persona looks like?

Stormie Andrews 

You’re absolutely correct. So, you nailed it. When I moved from sales to Director of Sales and Marketing with the home builder that I was with, they said Stormie; we want you to take over the marketing department because marketing and sales, you know, Stormie, it’s exactly the same thing. And I’m like, ‘Oh yeah, that’s exactly the same thing.’ And that’s where my hair went grey instantaneously overnight because it’s not exactly the same thing. But during that time frame, when I was in the homebuilding industry for this particular home builder, I was responsible for all corporate training. And this turned out to be an incredible blessing. Because the owner of the company would give me a budget where I was able to travel the country, attend incredible seminars and training events, and do whatever I needed to as long as I could bring that whatever I learned back to the company. And that’s when I got my certification, NLP neuro-linguistic programming. And that gave me lots of insights as to the whys. You know why this is happening where, from a sales standpoint, things were happening instinctually, and once I got the knowledge behind it, I realized that ‘Oh, okay, this makes lots of sense.’ I now understand the why. And I started incorporating elements of NLP into my sales training. Well, then the world started going digital. And what I realized in the digital space is that websites, digital assets, were lousy communicators, were lousy salespeople, because typically, the person creating the messaging on this digital employee or this digital asset was they were lousy at doing it. So, if you didn’t have an extreme understanding of who your customer was, their pain points, their issues, their triggering events, you were just going to have a lousy salesperson, a lousy spokesperson, a lousy customer and service person, in this digital employee that’s designed to represent your brand. And oftentimes as the first person that someone comes into contact with, so lots of trial and error, lots of diving into the buyer’s psychology, their pain points, their motivations to create far superior messaging, and fortunately, it worked out okay.

Mark Stiving 

Glad for you. I’m guessing that what you found is really similar to the way I think in terms of value. Because I’m always focused on how does a buyer perceives value? And I just heard you say three things that struck me as well. That’s that that’s that that’s that. And you said, let’s say, so, what are their pain points? I think you said aspirations and trigger events. And I thought those were really interesting, because each one of those, I would have rephrased in my world as, how do people perceive value? What are the problems they’re trying to solve? What are the results they’re trying to achieve? And what caused them to realize that they had a problem in the first place?

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely. We’re on the same page. 100% on the same page; we just phrase it a little differently.

Mark Stiving 

Yeah. Okay. And so now, do you do B2B or B2C or both?

Stormie Andrews 

Both.

Mark Stiving 

Both. In the B2B world, I spend most of my time in the B2B world, and I think that’s because B2B companies don’t get value, and they really have to, because their customers can measure value in dollars. Where B2C, you can’t measure value in dollars; it’s emotional feeling and content. And so, let’s focus a little bit on B2B if you don’t mind.

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely.

Mark Stiving

In a B2B sale, often, there are many buyers inside a company. Do you create different personas for each of those individual buyers or buyer types?

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely. And I make recommendations. If a company’s going through the exercises themselves, I let them know there isn’t one persona. The CFO may have different objectives than the VP of Sales, who is the person who is making the initial recommendation. And if you have the exact same message, or if you create it messaging for the VP of Sales, that messaging isn’t going to resonate, or it may not necessarily resonate with the CFO. Different objectives, different understandings, different motivations. So absolutely, I recommend multiple personas based on who is making the decision, what their motivations are, what their pain points are. So, this way, you can create messaging that addresses their issues, concerns, and pain points.

Mark Stiving 

Nice. And so, when you go to those individual personas, CFOs, we’ll just stick with a CFO for a second. Do you interview a bunch of CFOs? Do you ask your clients to interview a bunch of CFOs? And what are the types of questions that we’re asking as we’re talking with them?

Stormie Andrews 

So, one of the reasons, you know, for the world’s best buyer persona system is anytime you can get a focus group, a focus group of CFOs, or have the ability to interview a CFO or the persona, that is the gold standard, that’s where you want to go. But in reality, in the real world, getting those, putting those meetings together, they just don’t happen as frequently as they should. The CFO would love to help you, but he’s busy. So, getting that an hour meeting on the books becomes extremely difficult. So, what the world’s best buyer persona does is, it’s really the next best thing, when you’re not able to have the interview because it allows you to bring your team together, figure out your best understanding to build the psychological profile when you’re not able to have that meeting.

Mark Stiving 

Nice. So, I do something very similar. I call it a value discovery workshop. Because in general, I think there’s this innate understanding of how our customers perceive value or what the problems are they’re trying to solve. But I think the customers, my customers, my clients don’t know how to articulate it. And they don’t know how to say it in a way that resonates. And so, let me use one of my favorite examples, which we’ve all heard. And I want to hear how you would get to this with your process. Okay, we heard Ted Levitt say nobody wants to buy a drill; they want to buy a hole. In truth, nobody wants to buy a hole. They want to hang a picture over the fireplace. Well, in truth, they don’t want to hang a picture. They want a good attractive looking living room. One truth, they don’t want an attractive living room. They want their wife to be happy with them, so they can go golfing on Saturday. Right? And so, there’s this long process of things that we’re after, and we buy this object. How do we get to, in my world, how do we get to the value that resonates? But in your world, what is it that you’re going for when you think about a persona?

Stormie Andrews 

So, when I think about a persona, one of the things that I’m looking for is motivation, and we use Maslow’s hierarchy of needs as the benchmark for motivation. In the B2B space, oftentimes, I find, in most cases, not in all cases, but in many cases, the need they’re looking for is the safety need. This is going to be a person that’s making a decision, but they’re looking in, especially in the B2B space, they’re looking to make a safe decision because if they make the wrong decision, they may have warranted or unwarranted fears that their job, their reputation, their career may be on the line. So, if you’re a new vendor that may have the greatest product, like the greatest thing, since sliced bread, while the person who’s making the decision needs to make a safe decision. So, one of the things that we want to start looking for is what problems the situation that they’re in that they currently find themselves in has? What problems has that caused? We also want to understand what are their action beliefs, what are their inaction beliefs? And that’s huge because if we understand what their belief system is, right, wrong, or indifferent, but what do they believe will happen? If they make the right decision? If everything turns out like, you know, unicorns and rainbows, on the other hand, what happens if they don’t take action? Or they make the wrong decision? They go with the wrong vendor, the wrong supplier? We need to understand that belief system; we need to understand what emotions, you know, is this a type of decision that keeps them up at night? Is this the type of decision that keeps their team up at night, because you know, this stuff tends to roll down hills? Those are items that we want to identify, we also want to identify noise in the marketplace. And the way I define noise is what are they seeing as it pertains to this problem, this solution? What are they being told? What are they hearing by the half glass full? And the half glass empty camp? And then what are they doing about it? There have been many instances where we’ll go through this exercise where companies are spending an extreme amount of money in regards to their marketing efforts and they’re putting there, when we get to the exercise of what they’re doing about it, we find out that they’ve been putting lots of energy and effort into places where their ideal prospect isn’t at, they’re not hanging out there. So that turns out to be a futile effort. And then we go into, you know, we want to look at positioning factors, words, words, a positioning factor, that’s not a so-what-me-too statement. I’m sure you’ve run into this when, however, you go through this particular exercise, but I run into it frequently when we start diving into the positioning factors, where many organizations have a lot of so-what-me-too statements were like we care? Well, your customers, do your competitors advertise that they don’t care? You know, can you defend the position? And is the position unique? And often, as we go through that exercise, we can spend an entire day just on positioning factors because we have to have unique positioning factors that are designed to resonate with someone, not everyone. And if we can align those positioning factors, put them in alignment with the belief systems, the motivations of their ideal prospects, they’re going to be in better shape.

Mark Stiving 

That makes sense. Oh, God, I love the so-what-me-too statements. I think those are phenomenal. And I hear them all the time. There’s no doubt, right? And what I also love is that people often give you, it’s maybe it’s not a so-what-me-too, maybe it’s just a so-what, but people are giving you the ‘Oh, we’ve got the best blah, blah, blah, doesn’t matter what it is.’ And you’re like, but who cares? Right? Who cares? It just doesn’t matter. So, okay, I love the way you’re doing this. There are lots of things you’re putting in a buyer persona that I can’t put my head around; how does that influence my pricing? But I’m sure it influences my marketing, right? There’s no doubt in my mind, right? Do you put anything like willingness to pay in your buyer persona? Is there any way to capture how important this problem is to this persona relative to another persona?

Stormie Andrews 

So, there is a section that we call our TINB, which stands for There is no B. So, the exercise that we go through if we build it in a pyramid, so the bottom of the pyramid is an A equals B provider. So, from a prospect standpoint, if I perceive you as an A equals B provider, it all comes down to price; whoever has the lower price wins because I see no difference between the two of you. The next step up on the pyramid is an A is greater than b provider, meaning that I see more value in your goods and services, which means there’s not as much pressure on the pricing that that particular prospect values your value that you bring to the table instead of price. Then the top of the pyramid is the TINB; there is no B. So, don’t get me wrong, pricing may have a bearing on the situation, but that is a consideration that’s much further down the wrong you are someone in their eyes that there is no B when it comes to the goods and services that you provide, there simply is no B. So, even though it’s indirectly tied to pricing, pricing isn’t part of the equation, but it’s about providing value, it’s about providing an experience, it’s about providing a deliverable that is far superior than that of the competition. Even if it’s the same product, then it comes down to the experience; how do you take your experience to the next level to where there is no B in that person’s eyes. And when that happens, they’re not concerned about price, you shouldn’t be concerned about price you have to be, you know, that’s not the number one driver because the problem with pricing is, you know, it’s a race to the bottom, and over a period of time, there’s always going to be a bigger better player that can come in that’s in a position where they can have extremely low margins, and that puts you out of business, or it puts you in a position to where you’ve got to do a lot more work for the same revenue. So, it’s about when we get into that positioning in the marketplace, we can find that market gap that sets, you know, the users of the world’s best buyer persona that sets them apart from their competitors, they market on that unique positioning that they have within the market. And that becomes their value proposition that can become their TINB, where pricing isn’t the number one driver.

Mark Stiving 

Yep. Ideally love what you just said. And I’m going to restate what you said in words that I would normally use. Okay, perfect. I’d love it. Okay, There Is No B is the same thing as saying they’re making a ‘will I’ decision and not making a ‘which one’ decision.

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely.

Mark Stiving 

A is greater than B is saying they’re making a ‘which one’ decision, and we’re looking at the differentiation between the two, and we paid for; however, we’re better what the value is we deliver that’s better than our competitors. And then A equals B; I think of that as a commodity. And I have this line of strong belief. And I hope you agree and back this up. And that is, ‘If you think you’re selling a commodity, you should get out of that business.’ Completely.

Stormie Andrews

Absolutely.

Mark Stiving 

Everybody can define a way to differentiate something.

Stormie Andrews 

I agree wholeheartedly. And I love the way you say it.

Mark Stiving 

Well, it’s just a different language. So, I want to go to ‘There Is No B’. I love that concept. There Is No B, are we thinking that inside a company I’ve got, let’s just say three different personas. One persona might have a There Is No B, and another persona might not. Or one persona might have one thing that’s if There Is No B and another persona might have some other driver of There Is No B.

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely. Remember, we’re building personas for the various decision-makers. So, the persona that we build for the CFO will be different from the persona for the director of sales, right? And there is, you know, TINB proposition will be completely different. And so, the questions that we go through, when we’re building out the TINB, we’re asking the customer experience, what makes your customer experience unique? That’s the first question in the TINB. Another question is, why would they want to repeat this experience? You know, what makes your experience unique? Because we are in an experiential economy. Why should they believe that they can’t get this type of experience anywhere else that makes a world of difference? Maybe, you know, why would they want to tell others about the experience? Even if they won’t tell their competitors about why they would want to write, what sets you apart, and then willing to pay for it. Why should they be willing or heavy and willing is not even a strong enough word; it’s really more of the desire to pay for it? Because it’s something that they believe that the value that your goods and services are going to bring to the table far outweigh the investment. So, there’s a desire to pay for it. So, when we’re building out that TINB proposition, those are the questions that we’re dissecting, and we’re going to build a TINB for each of the players involved. So, if you’re in a scenario, in a B2B, if there’s, you know, there’s usually the person that is, you know, the person that’s gathering the information, you know, who’s gathering the information to bring the solutions to the table, their motivations are going to be totally different than the CFO. So, if you know this is going in, what if we build a persona where we build resources for that, the initial influencer, and then we create a packet. We know what the CFO is; we can build a packet that they can download and give to the CFO that addresses their problems, issues, concerns, and motivations. That makes the world, or it’s designed to speed up the sales process and make for a much smoother sales process.

Mark Stiving 

Right. And it makes that influencer look good because he’s giving information to the CFO that the CFO really wants.

Mark Stiving 

Absolutely. Remember, the influencer is the safety need. They want to make a safe decision. If they come to the table with something that is irrelevant or just seems out of place. That’s not a good place to be in, and chances are they’ve got to do 150 hours worth of work in 40 hours right in 30 hours. So, the easier we can make it for the influencer. The better position we’re in because we’re making it easy for that influencer to pass us on up the ladder.

Mark Stiving 

Okay, you’ve gotten me excited, Stormie. Now, I have to ask a really hard question. Do you believe there is a TINB for every persona product combination?

Stormie Andrews 

Do I believe there is a TINB for every product persona combination? Well, if we’re dealing with the 50-cent widget, maybe not. But for in the B2B space? Absolutely. It may be the same, depending on what the situation is, but it’s something that needs to be addressed. Let me put it that way. It needs to be addressed for every product for each and every one of those scenarios. And maybe that TINB for one scenario plays into the fact in the next scenario. But, if you have competing product lines, or product lines that are completely different, or scenarios to where the motivations are completely different, well, then they’re very well may need to be a new TINB. So, it needs to be addressed for each persona.

Mark Stiving 

Okay, so I’m not sure I agree with you, but I really wish; I really hope you are right if that makes any sense. So, I’m selling a piece of factory equipment. And I’ve got a competitor who also sells a piece of factory equipment; we’ll call it bottling equipment, right? We’re putting liquid into bottles, and this puts liquid into bottles. What do you think a TINB might be for a CFO?

Stormie Andrews 

So, for the CFO, we look at the CFOs motivations, right? The CFO, it comes down to the bottom line. So maybe their motivation is the speed of the bottling equipment, reliability of the modeling equipment, maintenance of the bottling equipment, downtime of the bottling equipment, upgradeability of the bottling equipment. And it may be different for an older CFO versus, you know, newer CFO because they have some experiences that are involved there, where they went for the low-priced version at one point, but then they got crushed as it pertained to maintenance and all the other things that are involved with manufacturing equipment.

Mark Stiving 

So, when we pause you for a second, because I’m not sure that that’s how I understood TINB to mean, and so let me test this. I’ve got a CFO, and I walk in, and I say, ‘Look, I’ve got the most reliable piece of equipment.’ And they go, ‘Well, let me look at your MTBS. So, I’m going to compare that with this other guy’s MTBF. Okay, now it’s not a TINB; it’s an A greater than B.

Stormie Andrews 

Correct. So, you know, so yeah, let me clarify that, because those are just some of the pain points that we work through as we’re putting the TINB together. So, what is it about the experience because there are two different providers? And let’s say on paper, it looks exactly the same, right? What is the process of getting the machinery delivered, installed? And you know, that after the sale service, you know, between the two companies, what processes are in place to give that CFO, lack of better words, the warm and fuzzy that’s going with this particular provider? Is it the right decision, irrespective of price, because the solutions that they’re bringing to the table are going to give, it’s going to meet the objectives for the bottom line? But it’s also going to give that CEO that, you know, going back to safety, you know, he’s the one that’s making the final decision, right and in many cases. So, what can give him the assurance as him or her the assurances that they’re looking for that this is not only the right solution provider but the absolute solution provider? And those are things that typically we’d have to go through and, you know, within that space and work through it regarding the deliverables that the company can deliver. So, we take menu cars as an example. Okay, I drive a Tesla. And I used to be a Lexus person prior to Tesla. And they’re both cars; they’re both designed to get me, you know, point A to point B. But after owning a Tesla, I can never see myself going back to a traditional car manufacturer. Not that they’re bad, but experiencing over-the-air updates. You know, having a car that has more features today than it did when I bought it, which is pretty incredible. And the service has been I’ve had a few service issues. And the service that I received from Tesla when the regular 12-volt battery died, the fact that I was able to text them through their app, and they were able to diagnose the problem through the app and send someone out to my home the next day without me having to go anywhere. That’s a pretty incredible TINB experience. That’s something that Lexus that’s who I used to be with that I was a diehard for 20-plus years, just can’t compete with. It’s on a different level. So, I feel that Lexus or excuse me that Tesla is the, remember, this is B2C obviously, but it’s a very safe decision for me to make on all aspects.

Mark Stiving  

Yes, and so I would rephrase everything you just said, okay, as, in the world of Tesla, you have found a series of products or features or capabilities that you trust and love. Yep. And you don’t know that they exist anywhere else. So why not just stick with Tesla? Because I’ve heard Audi is going all-electric for everything. And why wouldn’t you go try Audis, automatic upgrades over the air and blah, blah, blah, right? So, they may very well have all that. You just don’t know that. And so, you believe that this is what you get? And you’re going to stick with Tesla. Right? And by the way, there’s nothing wrong with those decisions.

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely right.

Mark Stiving 

Right. It’s just the way to think about in your mind; There Is No B. I’m completely in agreement with that.

Stormie Andrews 

And remember, it goes back to my, you know, the belief systems that we address in the World’s Best Buyer Persona early on, what is the belief systems and you just dive, you know, you just articulated that belief system. And that helps out tremendously as you’re putting things together.

Mark Stiving 

This is fascinating. Now, I’m going to go back and think about There Is No B more, and you and I can have more conversations about this offline someday when you know, good, but I’m not sure I’m with you yet.

Stormie Andrews 

Okay, that’s fine. That’s fair. That’s absolutely fair. I love it.

Mark Stiving 

I’m not sure with you because I think a CFO, if I bring to them two choices, or if I bring one choice, they’re going to say give me the other alternatives. What else are you looking at? And so, it feels to me like there’s almost always a B, but what I’m looking for, are the features or capabilities that differentiate my product so much in the things that matter to that persona to the CFO, or to the director of sales, or whoever it is, that they outweigh any price difference or price pressure?

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely.

Mark Stiving 

So, I would still look at it as there’s a B, but our differentiation value is huge. And that’s what we’re driving for. But I love the concept; There Is No B. Absolutely love it. Stormie, I think we’re running out of time. But before we wrap up, I’m going to ask you the question I ask everybody, what’s one piece of pricing advice you would give our listeners that you think would have a big impact on their business?

Stormie Andrews 

One piece of pricing advice? Well, this is something I’m sure you share with your audience, is, it’s not about you. So, if you make it about you, you’re the one buying your goods and services. So, it’s not about you. It’s not about your goods and services. It’s about your prospects, your ideal customers, their pain points, their issues; the more time, energy, and effort you put into that, the more in alignment you’re going to be as it pertains to your pricing.

Mark Stiving 

I think that’s absolutely spot on. And one of my favorite sentences is to say nobody cares about your product.

Stormie Andrews 

Absolutely.

Mark Stiving 

I love sailing. Stormie, thank you so much for your time today. If anybody wants to contact you, how can they do that?

Stormie Andrews 

Just go to outsmarttools.com. If you go to outsmart tools, it gives you links to everywhere that I can be found. There are also some free tools there. I’ve got a great tool called a marketing wheel, which is just a great self-audit that you can dive into to see where your marketing is at, but outsmarttools.com will link you to wherever you need to be linked to that in regards to getting in touch with me.

Mark Stiving 

Alright, Episode 137 is all done. Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this, would you please leave us a rating and a review? Also, don’t forget to check out my new book Win Keep Grow – How to Price and Package to Accelerate your Subscription Business. It’s currently available on Kindle and Audible. Hardcopy is going to be available at all bookstores on October 5th. But if you want an early signed copy, you can order one from our website at impactpricing.com. And finally, if you have any questions or comments about the podcast or pricing in general, feel free to email me at mark@impactpricing.com. Now, go make an impact!

Mark Stiving 

Thanks again to Jennings Executive Search for sponsoring our podcasts. If you’re looking to hire someone in pricing, I suggest you contact someone who knows pricing people. Contact Jennings Executive Search.

Related Podcasts