Impact Pricing Podcast

Ep106: 10 Signs your Revenue is Scalable with Chris Hopf

 

Chris Hopf is a Trusted and Respected Monetization + Pricing Strategy Consultant to Innovative Software and Technology Market Leaders. He helps innovative software and technology companies of all sizes create, recognize and capitalize on opportunities to achieve their full market potential – every day – every transaction. For more than twenty-five years, he has worked as an owner, employee, and as a consultant with small startups, mid-sized mergers, and Fortune 50 Corporations such as Microsoft and United Technologies. 

In this episode, Chris shares why companies should know how to communicate their value as there is always pressure to reduce price. In this regard, they need to stand up for their value. He also talks about how companies must understand the distinction of strengths, advantages, and alternatives, so they won’t be missing opportunities to be always relevant to their customers. 

 

Why you have to check out today’s podcast:

  • Discover the ‘Ten Steps to Scalable and Recurring Revenue’ and see where you can work on your strengths and advantages to always put you in a better and unique position against your competitors 
  • Find out how to always reinforce the value you are delivering to your customers so they won’t take it for granted, and so you always create value and not destroy it  
  • Learn how to prioritize your efforts in terms of acquiring customers so you are spending time well focusing on being relevant 

 

“Give your pricing a chance. And part of that is making sure that you’re taking a really honest look at what your advantages are, and honest look at what your advantages will be in the future. And making sure that you’re giving those advantages the best chance.”  

– Chris Hopf 

 

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Topics Covered:

01:36 – The different ways Chris works with companies 

03:09 – How he got involved in Pricing by chance 

04:09 – His main reason for staying with Pricing all these years 

05:29 – What is ‘The Revenue Due Diligence: The Ten Steps to Scalable and Recurring Revenue’ all about 

06:29 – Why would someone pay? 

08:32 – Who is willing to pay — what ‘The Pricing Window’ visual is all about 

09:27 – How can you influence the ability to pay  

10:37 – Why is it important to understand who your customers are and prioritize your efforts 

11:48 – When are they most likely to pay — understanding the ‘buyers’ journey’ 

13:10 – How seasonality’s affect how companies buy 

15:28 – How will they know about you — how is it best for people to know about the value and the advantages that you deliver to your customers 

16:36 – Why is it that in the ten steps mentioned, in no way does it ask how much should we charge 

17:04 – Why choose you now — what are your advantages 

18:13 – What is the key to creating a sense of urgency 

20:01 – Pricing problem versus value messaging opportunity 

21:27 – Why do companies sometimes don’t do a very good job of communicating their advantages 

22:15 – Distinction between advantage and a strength 

23:09 – Why keep choosing you, and why pay more from you? 

23:28 – Why tell others about you? 

24:27 – Why stop choosing you? 

25:43 – Why always highlight to your customers the value you are delivering to them 

27:05 – Chris’ best pricing advice that will impact your business 

27:41 – Stand up for your value 

 

Key Takeaways:

“One way you can influence the ability to pay or possibly drive or increase the ability to pay is if you think of your solution and the people within the organization that are impacted the value that is received.” – Chris Hopf 

“Companies don’t think through these in a very organized and deliberate way. And they can spend a lot of time focusing on being relevant, and acquiring customers that really are and should be considered distractions, maybe distractions for now, and maybe not in the future. But it really is important to prioritize your efforts.” – Chris Hopf 

“For some companies, there’s seasonality to how they buy, and this isn’t only their initial purchase, their initial decision to do business with you, but what are they most likely to pay to expand with you?” – Chris Hopf 

“What I found is sometimes people do a relatively good job, some better than others around understanding their advantages. But they don’t go to that next step around, ‘Why now?’. What are you going to do to compel action?” – Chris Hopf 

“What’s key to creating a sense of urgency is creating a sense of opportunity, you create that sense of opportunity, and you frame that well in their minds in terms that they understand and relate to their business and the outcomes they care about. And then that’s how you’re going to create that sense of urgency. But what’s key is that it needs to be directed back at your solution over other alternatives.”  – Chris Hopf 

People actually don’t spend much time understanding with clarity an honest assessment of their advantages over alternatives.” – Chris Hopf 

“A lot of times when people reach out to somebody like me, is they think they have a pricing problem. And oftentimes, they actually just have a value messaging opportunity, right. So, they aren’t doing a very good job of not only communicating their value that will resonate with their prospects and customers, but they don’t do a very good job of communicating their advantages.” 

 

Connect with Chris Hopf:

 

Connect with Mark Stiving:   

  • Email: mark@impactpricing.com
  • LinkedIn

 

Full Interview Transcript  

(Note: This transcript was created with an AI transcription service. Please forgive any transcription or grammatical errors. We probably sounded better in real life.) 

Chris Hopf   

Give your pricing a chance. And part of that is making sure that you’re taking a really honest look at what your advantages are and honest look at what your advantages will be in the future and making sure that you’re giving those advantages the best chance. 

[Intro] 

Mark Stiving   

Welcome to Impact Pricing, the podcast where we discuss pricing, value, and the tight relationship between them. I’m Mark Stiving. Today, our guest is Chris Hopf. Here are three things you want to know about Chris before we start. He was our guest on episode 19, where we talked about his pricing metric decision guide, a pretty valuable tool, I thought. He’s founder of Pricing Wire, a pricing consultancy that’s been around for 13 years now. And he has worked with over 2,000, that’s software and technology companies. Welcome, Chris. 

Chris Hopf   

Thanks for having me back, Mark. Good to talk to you. 

Mark Stiving   

2,000 companies that means you can’t keep a job. Sorry. 

Chris Hopf   

No, it’s okay. It really has to do with how I offer my services that opens me up to work with a lot of different companies. Some consultancies tend to focus on large projects. Because I can help people in smaller ways, that really opens me up to work with a lot more companies. 

Mark Stiving   

Nice. Okay, so I’m curious, you got me? How do you work with companies? 

Chris Hopf   

Well, so for example, there’s a number of people that just go to my website, they find me, either they’re recommended, or they just do a search. And sometimes people just book a strategy session, either 30 minutes, 60 minutes or two hours, and just kind of cover any top-of-mind challenge or question that they may be facing, and want some outside perspective on. Other ways are, I do a pricing strategy review. And so that’s a more comprehensive effort. But it’s really tailored to companies that, perhaps are about to launch something or are initially thinking about their monetization approach. And so, they just again, want outside perspective, another way is a strategy summit. So, I’ve done a number of these not so much in the last year, but typically go on-site and spend one or two days and get the right people on the same page in the same room. And then the other is a more comprehensive. What a lot of people think of sometimes when they think of a pricing consultancy is, it’s a very comprehensive in-depth, effort. 

Mark Stiving   

Nice, I love that. I think doing the one-hour calls are a lot of fun.  

Chris Hopf   

I agree. 

Mark Stiving   

So much value out of it. And they’re so confused before the call. So, I think they’re a blast. 

Chris Hopf   

And I’ve worked with so many different companies that probably wouldn’t have had the opportunity to talk to and kind of hear their challenges, hear their success, what’s worked for them. And some really unique companies. It really is enjoyable. 

Mark Stiving   

Nice. So how did you get into Pricing in the first place? 

Chris Hopf   

Well, so, I’ve been involved in pricing by chance, perhaps at every company that I’ve ever worked for. So initially, we may have talked about this briefly on the first episode that we did together. But I worked at a grocery store that was growing in the northwest area pretty rapidly. And I had a manager that really was very open to people that showed interest to get involved in the business in greater ways. So, not only were they implementing a new software solution, but also, I was able to before I even knew a lot of the terms and the realities around pricing, I was able to test out pricing in the real world in the stores that I worked in. And then from there, every company that I’ve worked for, I’ve been involved in pricing in some way as well as implementing or customizing software solutions to manage sales, marketing, and pricing and bringing those teams together. 

Mark Stiving   

Okay, and so why do you stay in Pricing? 

Chris Hopf   

Well, the main reason is because it touches every area of the business. And I just really enjoy the challenges and the realities around how pricing does touch and how companies often don’t think about that. And they miss opportunities. And so, my ability to help companies see things in different ways, and then put themselves in a position to really achieve their full potential is very rewarding. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, I think, at least for me, very similar, but I think that so few people understand Pricing the way we think about it. And yet, it’s so powerful that it’s a blast helping companies get through this. 

Chris Hopf   

It really is, it really is. And for those that actually get around to allocating their time and attention to it, it can seem somewhat daunting, but it can also, they start to see that the opportunities that they likely have been missing out on. And it really kind of…it inspires them in a way that once they get the ball rolling, it’s like, why haven’t we done this before? We really need to make this a priority going forward.  

Mark Stiving   

Nice. Nice. Okay, you sent me before we started talking today, you sent me a document called ‘The Revenue Due Diligence: The 10 steps to Scalable and Recurring Revenue’. First off, why did you build this? What is it? 

Chris Hopf   

Well, this is really come out of my work with, again, all the companies that I’ve either worked at, or worked with as a consultant. And it really is to help companies really prioritize their time. One thing that I often say to either a prospect or a client is, even if they got the right people, even if they picked three very key stakeholders in their company, and just spent 60 minutes talking about how they would answer these questions, they can be in a much significantly different position to really affect the outcomes that they care about. And one of those primary outcomes when people talk about pricing, is really the impact that it has on revenue. So that’s why I built this.  

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, and you know, it’s fascinating, we’ll go through these 10. And I’m sure everybody hears them. And we’ll post this on the show notes as well. But what’s really fascinating about it is most of these aren’t really about pricing, which I find amazing. I’m completely in agreement with you, but I find it amazing. So, for example, number one, why would someone pay? What does that have to do with Pricing?  

Chris Hopf   

Well, it has everything to do with Pricing. Yeah. And these are worded intentionally, you know, you’ll hear the word pay a lot, because oftentimes, some companies, especially some technology, or software startups, they have an innovative technology or solution, and they want people to use it. And for some people that are more perhaps on the engineering side of things, and building the solution. They don’t necessarily allocate much time to how are we going to actually make this a viable, sustainable growing business? And so, the question is somewhat broad and intentional. And it’s not necessarily asking the question, why would someone pay for what you have to offer? But why would somebody pay for something, like, what you have to offer, not specifically your company. And again, for any of these, what’s really key is, it can be a challenge for some people, if they’re put on the spot to really answer these succinctly and with confidence. But that right there should kind of bring to mind that, ‘Hey, we really should be able to answer these questions’. And really, everybody in our company should be on the same page around how we’re answering these questions. 

Mark Stiving   

So, I really love these questions. I think they’re awesome. So, I’m going to take why would someone pay and put it in language that maybe my listeners are more used to hearing? And that really is, what problem are they trying to solve? And if I were thinking about it, it’s the value of solving the problem, or what we often call the ‘Will I’ decision. Will I buy something in this product category? And so, I think that’s just a fabulous question that we have to know the answers to. 

Chris Hopf   

I agree; I like how you’re wording that, but this is, I’ll just say I’ve intentionally worded it with ‘pay’ in there. Because sometimes people think of it in the terms that you described. And they don’t necessarily take that next step to follow up people what they will actually pay for it? Will, they keep paying for that type of thing? 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, I’m not questioning any of your wording. You just put it in a language that people might know. Okay, so, number two, who is willing to pay? 

Chris Hopf   

Right. So, the next question is, and I have a visual that I didn’t send with you, it’s I call it ‘The Pricing Window’. And really, if you think of it on the left-hand side, from the bottom to the top, that’s the ability to pay. And on along the bottom, from left to right, is a willingness to pay. So, there are lots of things that we can do, that can drive willingness to pay. And you’ll look at number three as ‘who is able to pay’. So, willingness to pay is different from actually paying. And because it’s really important, and perhaps when we go to the next one, I’ll kind of bring it together. But it really is important to understand the different ways you can drive willingness to pay. But also keep in mind around the realities around the ability to pay. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah. And so, it seems like ability to pay is a filter and willingness to pay is you could think of it as a filter, but it’s also something we can influence. 

Chris Hopf   

Yeah, that’s for sure. Yeah. And so, if we do jump to number three, around ability to pay around your ability to influence, there are some realities around the ability to pay, that you really can’t influence much around the ability to pay up an organization or an individual. But there are some things that you can do. So, for example, one way you can influence the ability to pay or possibly drive or increase ability to pay is if you think of your solution and the people within the organization that are impacted the value that is received. Could you possibly make a case for it jumping or extending to other functional areas in the business and therefore justify that they perhaps pool budgets from multiple functional areas, and that can actually increase the ability to pay? So those are some of the objections sometimes you hear from a sales standpoint around, you know, we just don’t have the budget. Well, there are opportunities if you will it, right, and you’re willing to go there to actually increase the ability to pay. 

Mark Stiving  

Yep, that makes all the sense in the world. And so, is there anything else you wanted to add as far as combining willingness to pay and ability to pay before we move on? 

Chris Hopf   

Well, if again, if I can send this to you after but if you visualize that, that visual that I just talked about ability to pay on the left, and willingness to pay across the bottom, in many cases, it’s very important to understand who your customers are. Again, why would somebody pay? But to draw a line somewhere on that up and down horizontally across for ability to pay, and everything below that line, are distractions. And so oftentimes, companies don’t think through these in a very organized and deliberate way. And they can spend a lot of time focusing on being relevant, and acquiring customers that really are and should be considered distractions, maybe distractions for now, and maybe not in the future. But it really is important to prioritize your efforts. 

Mark Stiving   

Yes. So even though we can influence willingness to pay and even ability to pay a little bit, it’s so much easier to land customers who have willingness and ability than try to influence that on the other side. 

Chris Hopf   

That’s right. Yeah. And there’s a lot more we could say about this. But for the sake of time, perhaps we should go on. 

Mark Stiving   

Okay, so number four, when are they most likely to pay? 

Chris Hopf   

Yeah. So, after you’ve thought through, and again, I suggest having at least a hypothesis around how you’d answer these. And one way you can think of that is if, then, right, so any of these questions? Why would somebody pay? Right? Why would someone pay? Well, if fill in the blank, then right? And the same with who is willing? Who is able? And then when you get to when are they most likely to pay? If what happens? What are the triggers? What needs, what are the things that may be unfolding, or have led to them, possibly you think about the buyers’ journey, right? And what’s really initiated that interest or that willingness to possibly question how they’re doing things. And so, it’s really important to understand what those triggers are. And the better you do that, the better position you’re going to be in to speak to those and be relevant, and not miss those opportunities. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, when I first heard that, or first read it, in my mind, I’m thinking, timing, like, I’m selling to the education system. And so, I’ve got to close it at certain times, because that’s when they make all their purchases. But based on your example, your description, I could easily see the news talks about a huge data breach at Target. And so suddenly, that triggers a whole bunch of people wanting to buy more software security products. 

Chris Hopf   

That’s right. And another is there’s for some companies, there’s seasonality to how they buy, and this isn’t only their initial purchase, right, their initial decision to do business with you, but what are they most likely to pay to expand with you? Right? What are the things that are important to happen to encourage them to renew with you? And we’ll touch on some of those later. But one example, you know, I heard a conversion stat recently, around tax software, you know, like Turbo Tax, that the conversion rate is around 70%. But also, what’s important, and if you think about it, when are they most likely, what are people most likely to pay for tax software? Well, we’re right in that sweet spot right now, as far as the calendar goes, but are they most likely to pay in, say August? Probably not, they’re probably not a lot of conversions going on in August or a number of those months, you know, in the fall, and so forth. 

Mark Stiving   

Right, it makes a ton of sense.  

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Mark Stiving  

Okay, let’s hit number five, and then I’m going to make an observation on the first five, how will they know about you? 

Chris Hopf  

Yeah. And so, once you’ve answered this other question, this is a question oftentimes, in my work with my clients, and just working at companies, just the reality around the marketing effort, and making sure that you’re in sync from a sales, marketing, pricing product perspective that everybody’s on the same page around understanding how are people actually going to know and how is it best for people to know about the value and the advantages that we deliver to our customers. And so, you can quite literally list these out and then prioritize your effort. And I would imagine, that’s part of what most marketing teams do. But it’s really important that this is part of that conversation. And the reality back to the title of this being revenue, due diligence, it really is going to ultimately impact the revenue performance you’re able to accomplish. So 

Mark Stiving   

Yes, we kind of say, marketing is important. And are we doing our marketing? Do we know what we’re doing? What I’d really like to point out on these first five, and then I glanced at the last five as well, in fact, all 10 of these, in no case, do we say, what price should we charge? 

Chris Hopf   

Not so far. Yeah, exactly.  

Mark Stiving   

Yeah. And I find that fascinating, because you and I are Pricing people. And yet pricing really revolves around everything in the company. These are just awesome. I love these. 

Chris Hopf 

Right. It doesn’t ask the question, but it helps you answer the question with more confidence, and more clarity. And it also gets the organization in sync and on the same page. 

Mark Stiving 

So, number six, why choose you now? 

Chris Hopf   

Yeah. So, this is where it comes into specifically, what are your advantages? And why would the customer be in a better position to choose to do business with you now versus put it off next week, next month. When this happens, or that happens, the more you can speak to, and anticipate because you truly understand the customers you’re targeting. The more that you can frame your messaging around understanding their priorities, the better position you will be in for them to actually choose not only a solution like yours, but to choose specifically your solution. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah, and so number six feels to me, like it’s two things at once. And so, the one thing, it feels like, why choose you? And so that says to me, ‘Why choose you over your competitors?’ And in that case, in the language that I often use, its which one decision the buyers have to make? And then why make a decision now, which relates a lot back to when are they most likely to pay? But it’s really, is there a FOMO discount? Is there something we can do to make them decide today?  

Chris Hopf   

That’s right. Yeah. And so, you’re specifically talking about six kind of being two, there’s two parts to number six around why choose you now? Indeed, yeah. But what I found is sometimes people do a relatively good job, or, you know, some better than others around understanding their advantages. But they don’t go to that next step around, ‘Why now?’. What are you going to do to compel action? Right. That’s really important because, yeah, I mean, ultimately, I’ve had companies that I’ve worked with, that this has been a particular problem. They’ve done a relatively good job, if not a good job of communicating their advantages. But their competitors or alternatives have done a better job of why to choose them now. So, sometimes, companies have actually… are poor prospects, opportunities that they’ve had in their pipeline, they’ve lost because they haven’t created that sense of urgency. And what’s key to creating a sense of urgency is creating a sense of opportunity, you create that sense of opportunity, and you frame that well in their minds in terms that they understand and relate to their business and the outcomes they care about. And then that’s how you’re going to create that sense of urgency. But what’s key is that it needs to be directed back at your solution over other alternatives. 

Mark Stiving   

Can you give me an example of what you’re thinking out there? 

Chris Hopf   

Around? 

Mark Stiving   

Oh, the sense of opportunity. The reason I’m curious is when I think of the word ‘Now’, most of the time I think of the sense of urgency is, if you don’t act now, then something bad will happen. Like, I’m going to take the deal away or won’t be available tomorrow or lead times will extend or something right or raising prices. 

Chris Hopf   

So, I see where you’re going with that. And I think that is a very good point. But what I would perhaps just want to make sure people are also thinking of is, don’t go down that path unless it’s necessary. And so, to feel like you perhaps need to have some sort of special deal or offer or time-bound incentive or something like that, those have their purpose. And they’re an appropriate use case in which when you want to use those, but what is unfortunate is sometimes people feel like that has to be the case. And in doing that, they actually devalue their advantages, they don’t really give their value advantages an opportunity to perform. And it’s more about the deal than it is about the value. Do you see where I’m going with that? Absolutely. So, one thing around, you know, just some thoughts around value advantages, which are just so important. And a lot of times when people reach out to somebody like me, is they think they have a pricing problem. And oftentimes, they actually just have a value messaging opportunity, right. So, they aren’t doing a very good job of not only communicating their value that will resonate with their prospects and customers, but they don’t do a very good job of communicating their advantages. And do you want to know what that is, Mark? 

Mark Stiving   

Sure, let’s hear. 

Chris Hopf   

People actually don’t spend much time understanding with clarity, an honest assessment of their advantages over alternatives. And alternatives can be status quo, do nothing, it could be competitors. But a lot of companies don’t spend much time they make assumptions. Maybe they’ve identified some and they conclude that they’re perpetually going to be relevant and resonate. And the market is always shifting. And the advantages that may perform for you today, very well may not perform for you as well or at all in the future. And so that’s kind of where I’m going with some of this. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah. And I’ll add into that, by the way, I agree completely. And I’ll add to that is, even if you understand the differences, they often don’t understand how customers value those differences.  

Chris Hopf   

Exactly. And then there’s also… there’s a distinction that needs to be made between an advantage and a strength. And oftentimes, when I ask potential clients or clients, what are your top two advantages over, you know, alternatives, oftentimes, they struggle, number one, which it really should be, there should be clarity across the organization around what those advantages are. But aside from that, what they often bring up are strengths, that really, the competitors could also say, as well. And one of those is truly, the reality is that your people should be an advantage because nobody else has your people. But the reality is that your competitor could say the same thing, right? Unless you have some sort of individual that is perhaps well-known or recognized as has some sort of unique expertise, and they are representative or part of your company. 

Mark Stiving   

Excellent. Hey, we’re going to run out of time. So, I’m going to touch on the next two. But then I want to actually talk about number nine and number 10. Okay, next to seven was why keep choosing you. Number eight was why pay more from you? Love that one, by the way. 

Chris Hopf  

Yeah, seven and eight are really around retention. And then eight is around expansion. 

Mark Stiving  

Yeah. But number nine, why tell others about you? What do you mean when you say that? 

Chris Hopf  

So, this is another, you know, the reality for a lot of businesses is when you go back to number five, how will they know about you is word of mouth is one of the most powerful marketing realities around business, right. And it’s actually something that if you take the time, you can actually attribute to, there’s attribution, right, if you put yourself in the position. And so, this is really about companies making sure again, if we’re trying to put you in the best position to scale to really achieve your full revenue potential in a scalable and recurring way, right, is to make sure that you’re not missing out on opportunities to get more people telling other people about the value and the difference you’re making in their business, and quite frankly, in their life. 

Mark Stiving  

Yeah, absolutely. Okay, and then number 10, why stop choosing you? This feels like the only negative one up here. 

Chris Hopf  

It is, but it really can be used for a positive. And you know, this was created years ago. But it really has come to the forefront of people’s minds when you think of, for example, the COVID, and how that’s been handled, and how it has affected businesses and so forth. So, a lot of people wouldn’t have thought, you know, in the past that one of the reasons people would stop choosing us or stop choosing to do as much business with us would be a pandemic, right. So, again, that is one example but what are the other reasons and the more that you can proactively understand the realities around why your customers would stop choosing you, the more you can be in the position to, again, proactively put into place messaging, inform your roadmap around what you’re prioritizing around what you’re going to launch next. All those things are just really key. 

Mark Stiving  

Yeah. And I like what you just said in the following sense. At first glance, it feels like that’s the opposite of number seven. So, number seven was, why keep choosing you while you keep choosing because I’m delivering value and you’re growing as a company. So why stop choosing me? And it’s like, well, you’re not doing those. But there are other reasons. Can we identify what those are? Can we maybe mitigate what those are? Yeah, I think that’s a really good way to look at this. 

Chris Hopf  

I mean, a quick example of this is one company I worked with years ago, what triggered them to reach out to me was they were starting to see after about nine months, there was a lot more pressure on their pricing, pushback and objections. And this company was sending out invoices for 700K, 1.5 million, right? That’s their invoice. But believe it or not, Mark, and this is an honest to goodness, true story, the way that they were sending their invoice was an unformatted, Excel spreadsheet, they were doing nothing or around reinforcing their value. And so again, 10 is really around really highlighting the importance of reinforcing and reminding your customers of the value you’re delivering, because they will take it for granted. And they certainly will if you let them take it for granted. 

Mark Stiving  

Yeah, so one of my favorite lines is everybody in your company either creates or destroys value. 

Chris Hopf   

I agree with that. Yep. That’s for sure. And that’s quite literally everything they do, how they allocate their time, and attention is either making the case and reinforcing your value, or it’s doing the opposite. 

Mark Stiving   

Yep. Love that. Love that. Chris, this has been fabulous. Final question. What’s one piece of pricing advice you’d give our listeners that you think would have a big impact on their business? Well, that’s 

Chris Hopf   

Well, that’s the same answer as before, but maybe with some of what we touched on before. So, what I answered before was give your pricing a chance. And part of that is making sure that you’re taking a really honest look at what your advantages are, and honest look at what your advantages will be in the future. And making sure that you’re giving those advantages, the best chance to impact and influence and just everything that goes with reinforcing your value advantages in the minds of your prospects and customers. 

Mark Stiving   

So, don’t discount too quickly, too easily. 

Chris Hopf   

Well, I can give you another example of a company brand new to market, retail technology. I helped them actually close their first two big customers, the next opportunity was really big. And right there, they started having all these conversations around reducing their price to win this opportunity. And we had a difference of opinion, which is sometimes the case and should be the case, when consultants are helping their clients. They shouldn’t just tell them what they want to hear. But yeah, there’s always going to be pressures to reduce your price. It’s up to you to stand up for your value. 

Mark Stiving   

Yeah. Nice. Thank you, Chris. And thank you for your time today. If anybody wants to contact you, how can they do that? 

Chris Hopf  

Well, I’m certainly on LinkedIn. One thing that is really easy that along what we just talked about if they just did a Google search, in quotes, most important pricing advice. They probably land at more on this and also a simple tool to help them think that through. 

Mark Stiving   

Nice, perfect. Episode 106 is all done. No real close tonight. So, if you have any questions or comments about the podcast, or pricing in general, feel free to email me mark@impactpricing.com. Now, go make an impact! 

 

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