Impact Pricing Podcast

#393: Increase Your Pricing Power: Monetize SaaS with Ayon Bhattacharyya

Ayon Bhattacharyya is the Founder of Biz Growth Spurt, a consulting firm based out of New Zealand. He has experienced pricing in half a dozen companies, and he’s a passionate animal welfare advocate.

In this episode, Ayon talks about the ins and outs of monetization. He also tells us a bit about his company, Biz Growth Spurt, and why you might be in need of their services.

 

 

Why you have to check out today’s podcast:

  • Learn about the three pillars of monetization and why you can’t only focus on one of them
  • Know the difference between price metric and value metric and why it matters in getting more sales
  • Understand why articulating value is essential in keeping and growing your customers

“Understand your customers intimately and take the time to quantify your buyer personas so that you understand the use case of the value proposition, the willingness to pay the lifetime value, and the customer acquisition costs; so that you can better position and package to them and ultimately capture a fair portion of the value delivered to them.”

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Topics Covered:

01:33 – How Ayon got into pricing

03:15 – How Ayon defines “monetization”

04:24 – What packaging means to Ayon, in relation to monetization

05:26 – What Ayon means by “feature differentiation”

06:30 – Why Ayon hates freemium

08:04 – Free trials vs. Freemium: why it is important which of the two fits your business more

11:07 – How to decide which features go to which packages

14:02 – Price metric vs Value metric

19:59 – Why positioning is an essential part of monetization

23:22 – Ayon’s key to monetization: the combination of packaging, pricing, and positioning

25:25 – Biz Growth Spurt: What they do and who their ideal customers are

28:50 – The meaning of “monetization” according to Ayon vs the meaning of “monetization” according to ProfitWell

31:54 – Ayon’s pricing advice

32:49 – Connect with Ayon Bhattacharyya

 

Key Takeaways: 

“Once you have a deep understanding of your buyer personas, how they value your product, how they use your product, how your proposition aligns with their growth journey, then you can actually start putting your features into bundles. But you want to do that based on the level of importance of those features.” – Ayon Bhattacharyya

“How you present the packages and the value messaging that you put on your website is so important. If they [the customers] understand that they’re getting five times more value from the gold versus the silver, in their mind, it helps them to quantify that relative benefit of the upgrade and the potential ROI of an upgrade.” – Ayon Bhattacharyya

“If the perceived value isn’t there, if you aren’t communicating it, if you don’t have a strong brand presence, if your solution is so complex that customers don’t understand the value that they get from it, then you know, you’ve just wasted all of this money on product development and marketing. – Ayon Bhattacharyya

“Ideally, you want the messaging that you have on your packages is around the problem that you’re solving for the customer. That’s the key. It’s not about the features. Those are just more internal to you. And often the customers don’t get them.” – Ayon Bhattacharyya

 

People / Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Ayon Bhattacharyya:

Connect with Mark Stiving:   

 

Full Interview Transcript

(Note: This transcript was created with an AI transcription service. Please forgive any transcription or grammatical errors. We probably sounded better in real life.)

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Understand your customers intimately and take the time to quantify your buyer personas so that you understand the use case of the value proposition, the willingness to pay the lifetime value, and the customer acquisition costs; so that you can better position and package to them and ultimately capture a fair portion of the value delivered to them.

Mark Stiving

Welcome to Impact Pricing, the podcast where we discuss pricing, value, and the unbreakable relationship between them. I’m Mark Stiving, and today our guest again is Ayon Bhattacharya. Got it right. Here are three things you’d want to know about Ayon before we start. He is a Kiwi from New Zealand, of course. He’s founder of Biz Growth Spurt, a consulting firm in New Zealand, and he’s had pricing experience in many companies. Oh, and he’s passionate about animal welfare advocacies. How is your puppy Louie doing, Ayon?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Louie is doing great, thanks. He is much bigger, actually.

Mark Stiving

He’s no longer a puppy.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

I guess he’s over the two-year mark now, so I can’t really call him a puppy anymore. But he’ll always be a puppy in our eyes.

Mark Stiving

I’m sure. So, remind us quickly, how did you get into pricing?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Well, Mark, as is often the case with pricing professionals, I didn’t set out thinking that my career would revolve around helping companies to understand willingness to pay. I actually started out in commercial finance, having gained a master’s degree, but quickly realized that I had a knack for strategy and marketing as well as being analytical. So, I guess working as a pricing strategist just brought it all together for me, enabling me to partner across different areas of businesses; sales, product, marketing, finance, legal, as well as allowing me to work across almost any industry with that sort of transferrable expertise and skills. I actually started out in the airline industry and then led pricing functions in a variety of industries such as movie theaters, media, data monetization, e-commerce, and most recently the banking industry. But I actually now run my own consulting business helping SaaS companies to achieve and sustain profitable growth through effective monetization.

Mark Stiving

Yeah. I have to say, I think probably my favorite thing about pricing is that we work with so many other departments and people don’t think of it as this strategic thing that drives or is integrated with every department of the company. But it truly is. And I like working with every department that you mentioned, with the exception of legal. I just never, ever enjoy working with legal.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah, it’s certainly a more technical and complex area to be dealing with contracts and all that sort of stuff. But extremely important when you’re dealing with B2B pricing.

Mark Stiving

It is absolutely important. But they’re focused on mitigating risks in the future that I’m like, “Let’s go do business, let’s go do business.”

Okay, one of the things that I always ask my guests is, “What are you passionate about? What do you want to talk about?” And one of the things you said to me was “Monetization is the pathway to profitable growth.” And so, I wanted to ask: The first question is, when you say the word “monetization”, what specifically are you talking about? Because I think I’ve seen it used two or three different ways.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

For me it’s the mechanism by which you generate revenue for your business. And pricing, I consider it to be a subset of monetization, but specifically here, I’d be referring to monetization as a growth lever. So, when I think about monetization, I think about positioning, I think about packaging, and I think about pricing strategy all within that. And then I have a framework that sits across those three pillars.

Mark Stiving

Okay. So those were positioning, pricing, and packaging.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Correct.

Mark Stiving

So, before we jump into positioning – and I find that with the most interesting – let’s talk about packaging. I have recently in the last few years, come to the realization that pricing and packaging, especially in software companies, are so tightly intertwined, you just cannot do one without the other. So, what do you think of when you’re thinking of packaging?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

The way I think about it is how you charge, which is often as important, if not more important, as what you charge. For me there are two main levers of SaaS monetization. It features differentiation, and value metrics. And value-metric pricing is so critical to get right, because it has – from the data that I’ve seen – even more impacts than how you actually put the bundles together.

Mark Stiving

First of all, I want to step back. When you say the word “feature differentiation”, the first thing that jumped into my mind was “How do we differentiate from competitors?” But what you’re really saying is, “Which features do I put in which packages?” So, if I’m going to have good, better, best, which features make it into which package, or which offering? Is that right?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Exactly right. So, once you have a deep understanding of your buyer personas, how they value your product, how they use your product, how your proposition aligns with their growth journey, then you can actually start putting your features into bundles. But you want to do that based on the level of importance of those features. So, you want to do some research. It could be conjoint analysis or something like that to actually understand the relative importance of those features. You don’t want to be throwing in your high value features into your freemium. I hate freemium, by the way, but so if you did have freemium, then… That brings me out in a rush.

Mark Stiving

I’m going to have to ask you why you hate freemium. Well, you got to answer that one first, and then I’ll go back to what I was going to ask again. Why do you hate freemium?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

I understand why some companies have been very successful adopting freemium. However, from what I’ve seen, the vast majority of businesses are not a good fit for freemium. And essentially, what you’re doing is you’re demonetizing the entire SaaS space. You are training customers to expect value for nothing. And I’ve seen some really interesting research from ProfitWell, formerly known as Price Intelligently, that actually shows that over the past five years, the profound effect that that has had on willingness to pay – I’m trying to think off the top of my head – I think it was like 70% decrease in willingness to pay. It’s quite significant. And essentially, what happens with freemium is that if you put too much value into your freemium package, then you’ll never get your customers offer to upgrade to higher packages. But you’ve got those high support costs because they might be not paying you any money, but the still expecting a service and they’re still expecting that support.

And the other reason why I hate freemium is that it often attracts tire kickers. These are not your ideal customers. They’re just there for the ride because it doesn’t cost money. That was a very candid answer.

Mark Stiving

Well, that’s totally what I wanted to know. And I think those are reasonable issues. The one that says “We’re driving customers’ willingness to pay down”, that’s not my problem. That’s what Napster did to music. And, you know, competition does that. So, if the right business model is freemium, I don’t care that it drives down other people’s willingness to pay for customers.

The support part, I think, is a great argument. And if you haven’t built a product that either requires zero support or you don’t insist that it’s zero support, then you probably shouldn’t be in the world of freemium. Because freemium has to be a very low cost to serve a customer if you’re going to do that. And when I think of freemium, I think of it as the first step in this whole field of product-led growth, which we’re seeing more and more of in a bunch of the high-tech spaces.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

I would advocate for free trials over freemium. Ultimately, you want to give your customers an opportunity to experience the products and show enough value for them to go on to pay for it. Whether that is through upgrading from the freemium product, or whether that is through the free trial ending, and you then convert a fully-paid customer. I much prefer free trials because I think the conversion rates are much higher. If you’re on freemium and you don’t have to think about it, you can just sit there on freemium. The only time you have to actually think about it is as your requirements for greater value increase, then you might actually reassess and look at higher packages.

Mark Stiving

By the way, I don’t disagree with anything. I just love having these conversations. And so, I would say that it really depends on the business as to whether freemium fits or free trial fits. For example, Slack was incredibly successful with freemium, and I don’t know how you could have done a free trial and made that successful the way it was. And the other part is lately, you’ve seen a lot of people doing a let’s call it a “free trial freemium”, where I’m going to give you the full package of everything. You go use it. And when you’re 90 days or 30 days or whatever it is, is up, we’re going to revert you back to the freemium product if you haven’t chosen to buy the upgraded product.  Which I find that pretty interesting business model.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

That is interesting. That’s a little bit similar to the reverse free trials that I’ve been seeing lately, which I think is a great idea. And look, you mentioned Slack. Canva is another one. There’s a bunch of businesses that have been really successful with it. But, you know, for every ten businesses, if nine of them have really struggled because they may not be the right fit for freemium, but yet they’ve kind of gone in, they’ve associated PLG to two freemium, then that creates issues within this industry. Those are issues that I’ve seen.

Mark Stiving

No, I think the answer for people like you and me is making sure we know when does which one fit, right? So, when does it make sense to use freemium? When does it make sense to use free trial? I think that’s the real key. Okay. So, that was supposed to be the easy question. Now for the hard question.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Oh, gosh. I need a coffee.

Mark Stiving

How do you decide which feature goes in which package? Because I’ve got to tell you, I’ve got three different methods that I designed out and I teach. And it is a hard thing to do to make that decision. What’s your guidance to companies?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yes, I think, as I mentioned before about the customer journey, it’s about understanding your customers via personas, and then what I call building a ladder of value. So that’s essentially looking at the relative importance of your features and then building them into some kind of ladder, which then fits with your good, better, best type of proposition. I forgot the last half of your question.

Mark Stiving

Oh, no, that was good. It was all about how you make that decision? And it’s just because I’ve never found an easy way to do that.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

I think the it’s a very strong case for testing. I’m a strong believer in test and learn and trying different things with subsets of your base.

Mark Stiving

One of the things that I teach – and sadly, not enough companies are able to do this – but I like the idea of grabbing usage data from my current customers, seeing who uses which features by how much, and then letting that inform me as to what problems are they really trying to solve, and are there little segments and say, “Well, this is the basic, everybody uses this”. You’ve got to have that in your MVP or your good product, so everyone will want to look at it.

But I think usage data, if companies would just collect it and study it, I think it goes a long way to helping you understand what package or features should go into.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

I completely agree. And the other really, really important thing is that your customers actually understand and you should understand what compelling event triggers an upgrade. And they need to understand the value of that upgrade. And so, how you present the packages and the value messaging that you put on your website is so important. If they understand that they’re getting five times more value from the gold versus the silver, in their mind, it helps them to quantify that relative benefit of the upgrade and the potential ROI of an upgrade.

Mark Stiving

Yup. You’re absolutely speaking to the core because I think us, communicating value to our customers, is so crucial, and being able to do that in our packaging makes a ton of sense.

So, let me jump to the first one that you mentioned then. Oh, I’m sorry. Before we get to positioning, one more thing under packaging – I know that Patrick Campbell at ProfitWell uses the word value metric. And I actually talked to him about this. I’m wishing he would stop using that word. And I like to use the word pricing metric. And I use the word pricing metric to mean “This is what we charge for.” And I use the word value metric to mean “This is how our customers measure value or this is how they perceive the value of our product.” And certainly, our value metrics and our pricing metrics should be highly correlated with each other.

So, I tend to think of the two very differently. Now, I get it. I understand value metrics. I’m just hoping to change the way the world speaks about it. And actually, if you study a lot of pricing people, I think more pricing people use pricing metric than value metric for that specific thing. So maybe we can get you to change your mind on how you speak about that.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

But what would you consider the difference? I’m just interested. What would you say is the difference between the two?

Mark Stiving

I think that’s a great question. I’m trying to think of a company that we could use as an example. Oh, that’s easy. Let’s use Uber as an example. So, if as a customer, I’m going to ride Uber. What’s my value? My value is getting from one point to the other safely, on time. And so, I would fill out – I like to use the following sentence to define a value metric – your customers say “I love Uber because my blank went from blank to blank.” So, there’s a KPI or something. And so, I might say “I love Uber because my anxiety of waiting for a taxi to show up or hailing a taxi went to zero”. I no longer have to worry about that. So, to me that would make sense. But what’s Uber’s pricing metric? Because they don’t price on that. Uber prices on miles or time or, surge pricing, things like that. So, their pricing metric – we see it as a consumer. We see it as by the ride. But the real pricing metric is by the mile or by the minute or by the estimated mile or estimated minutes based on surge pricing. I don’t know if that makes sense to you or not.

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Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah, I’m just trying to relate that back to the SaaS world, how you might distinguish between a pricing metric and a value metric. In my mind they feel very, very much aligned.

Mark Stiving

Sure. Let’s pick salesforce.com, the thing that everybody knows, right? What is Salesforce’s pricing metric? They charge by the number of users. What is their value to the trick? Their value metric is not number of users. Their value metric should be efficiency of sales, incremental revenue, things like that. That’s why customers value Salesforce.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Interesting because I really promote actually moving from seat-based to usage-based. And for me, I think that’s where the value metric and the pricing metric may be one and the same. Would you agree with that?

Mark Stiving

They can be. But what you really want is you want them to be highly correlated. Let’s talk about LinkedIn for a second. LinkedIn has a pricing metric of Inmails, right? So how many Inmails can you send is one of their pricing metrics. So, what’s the value? Salespeople aren’t sitting around saying, “Boy, I sure wish I could send more Inmails to people”. But the value they get is being able to reach out to people that they’re not networked with or that they can go find on LinkedIn. So, they should be very highly correlated. Rarely are they identical. The one time I would say they’re identical is in outcome-based pricing for companies like PayPal, where I’m going to take 2% of the transaction. The more money you make, the more money I make. And those are pretty much identical, very, very highly correlated value metrics and pricing metrics.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

And I think sometimes it’s just too complex to actually use the value metric as the charging mechanism. It’s just too confusing for the customer, too hard to measure, etc. And so, in those cases, there may be a different pricing metric to the volumetric. I get your point now.

Mark Stiving

And, you know, the only thing we’re talking about is language. Because you do all this anyway, right? It’s like, “How do I get the right thing to charge for?” It’s just what we call it. That’s the only thing.

So now, let’s jump to the first one that you mentioned. And the reason I want to do that is because in my mind, I think of pricing and packaging always. I mean, this is like the thing that really matters to me. And you fill in positioning as part of monetization. And I just want to hear you talk about that for a few minutes.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah. Because I think without positioning value in the right way, without presenting it in a way that you’re not just simply listing features on a product or pricing page, without doing that, how do you expect customers to actually self-select a package designed for that buyer persona? It cannot be assumed that customers will understand the benefits and select the package that’s right for them without the articulation of value and the ROI that each solution delivers. And the other thing is that perceived value is the only value that matters when it comes to willingness to pay for goods and services. And so, it’s all very well kind of having this amazing pricing strategy, or trying to optimize your prices and building all of this value into your product, but if the perceived value isn’t there, if you aren’t communicating it, if you don’t have a strong brand presence, if your solution is so complex that customers don’t understand the value that they get from it, then you know, you’ve just wasted all of this money on product development and marketing.

Mark Stiving

I could not agree with you more. What I find fascinating is when you read through 99% of companies’ web pages, what you hear them tell you about is their features.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

 Feature Factory.

Mark Stiving

Yeah, feature factory. And they’re making the assumption that I, as a buyer, can take that feature and translate that into value to me. And most people can’t. Most people are not experts on those products. And the reason we’re on those Web pages is we’re trying to learn. So, I couldn’t agree with you more.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Ideally, you want the messaging that you have on your packages is around the problem that you’re solving for the customer. That’s the key. It’s not about the features. Those are just more internal to you. And often the customers don’t get them.

Mark Stiving

You’re actually speaking to the choir. I don’t know. Did you read my last book? That’s what it says in there.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

No, I haven’t yet. But it’s on the list.

Mark Stiving

No worries. So, it turns out, in my view, our buyers care about the problems they have and the results they might expect. And that’s it. So, it has nothing to do with our features. And some customers are smart enough to translate features into solutions to problems or results, but not that many. And we really have to figure out how to do that. Obviously, I agree with you completely.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Good.

Mark Stiving

And so, you think of monetization as the combination of those three things. Is that the key?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yes, absolutely. I think that they’re so inextricably linked that you can’t do anything in isolation. And so, in terms of the framework and the processes that I adopt with clients, I consider all three in conjunction with each other and the deep relationship with each other.

Mark Stiving

I’m thinking for a second, I actually like that approach. I think I take the positioning piece and assume that we can figure it out and fix it later if we can get the packaging and the pricing right. But I think solving the positioning while you’re doing packaging and pricing makes a ton of sense.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah, because I think that gives the client some motivation as well when they start to see the results. As you start to do things in conjunction, then you slowly start to execute on things and they start to see the traction, they start to see the improvement in SaaS metrics.

Mark Stiving

And the other thing I find fascinating is that most customers, most companies don’t know how to articulate the value their customers are getting, meaning they don’t know how to articulate the problems they solve or the results their customers might expect. And, until we can articulate those, it’s really hard to figure out what our packaging should be and what our pricing should be. So, they really do all tie together.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

100%. And that’s probably the second step in my process. To measure and quantify value. And that means you really need to understand, is your solution generating revenue for their customers? Is it saving them dollars? Is it supporting them with compliance, risk reduction? What is the value? You need to be able to measure that and ideally quantify it as well.

Mark Stiving

Yeah, that makes a ton of sense.

Ayon, tell me about your business. What do you actually do? Who is your ideal customer and what types of problems you saw for them?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Ideal customers would be midsize businesses. They range between five and about 50 billion in ARR at the moment. Across New Zealand and Australia, also looking to expand to the UK and the US this year. 2023 goals. Also expanding the team as well.

I am attracted to disruptive growth businesses that are looking for future funding or they may have already got that funding and they’re potentially looking at VCs, they are looking to improve their evaluations. And so, this monetization work in the SaaS industry often comes as an afterthought. And essentially, what I tend to coach companies on is that the days of acquisition at all costs is over. You know, IPOs are drying up, but there’s been a large increase in M&A activity. The market is consolidating, I think off the top of my head, IPO listing volumes for 2022 were down 93% year on year.

But that being said, there’s been a quantum shift towards usage-based pricing based on value drivers. I believe that 70% of recent IPOs were actually SaaS companies that adopted usage-based pricing. So, there’s some really interesting trends going on in the south space. I think I mentioned demonetization. There’s also commoditization. That has gone up significantly over the last five years, and inflation, obviously doesn’t impact SaaS companies in the same way that it does traditional businesses. But it still increases their costs in relation to sales, marketing, and product development costs. Particularly in light of the current labor shortages. So, this leads to a margin squeeze in the absence of price increases.

So, it’s a really interesting space to be in right now. I think that there will be a huge increase in companies focused on monetization as a growth lever.

Oh, I’ve got an interesting one for you, Mark. I don’t know, because you obviously talk to Patrick and they ProfitWell. So, they did a piece of research that actually looked at the three growth levers; acquisition, retention, and monetization. And they looked at if there was like a 1% increase in the lever, what would be the impact on profitability. So, for acquisition, it was 1% to 2%. 1% increase in acquisition, 2% in profitability. For retention, it was four times, but for monetization it was 12. And I think the data showed that monetization was four times more effective as a driver of profitability than acquisition and twice as effective as retention.

Mark Stiving

Okay, so I want to ask: When you use the word “monetization” just now, was that the same definition you had when we started the conversation?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

That’s a tough one because I’d have to ask Patrick what his definition station is when he did that research.

Mark Stiving

Can I explain it for a second, if you don’t mind?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Sure

Mark Stiving

I think what you described as monetization in this entire conversation we’ve had so far is perfect, right? I mean, this is truly what monetization is. How do we take our technology and monetize it to our marketplace? I think, Patrick, that’s another word that I think he uses incorrectly, where most consultants say “acquisition, retention and expansion” instead of “monetization”. So, “How do I get my current customers to buy more from me?” And I personally use the words “Win, keep, and Grow”, where we have to win customers, keep customers, grow customers. But that’s really what the third lever is, if I spend money on expansion, then I get a 12x return instead of a 2x return or 4x return. And that was the other place where I’ve seen the word “monetization”. It’s like, “What did you mean when you said the word monetization?”

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah, I think expansion and monetization, one is a subset of the other, or maybe in my mind those things are linked. I’m trying to figure out what the difference would be, but again, it’s just terminology, right?

Mark Stiving

I think in this case there’s a big difference in the following sense: Expansion is “How do I get a current customer to pay me more money next year than they paid me this year?” So, I can do it by raising your price. I can do it by upgrading you from good to better. I could do it by getting more usage out of you. Or there’s different techniques we can use to get you to buy more from me next year. I think of monetization as a much, much bigger picture as in, “I’ve got a new data set. How do I monetize my data set? I have a new technology. How do I monetize my new technology? We’re seeing artificial intelligence all over the place. How do I monetize artificial intelligence?” Which is very different from just the simple “I want to get customers to pay me more next year than they paid me this year.”

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah, sure. So, I guess then, expansion is a subset of monetization. You could say it’s a form of monetization, right? It’s your existing customers. Whereas I look at monetizing both existing customers and new customers. So, it’s a little bit more than expansion.

Mark Stiving

But at least that’s how I think about it. Now, Patrick could come on and say something completely different and change our minds. But that’s the way I think about it.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah. For me, it’s like apples and oranges. It’s more about the outcome that you’re providing to you to say.

Mark Stiving

It is. You’re spot on right, it is. Until we have to explain it to our customers.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Yeah.

Mark Stiving

We have to use words that really makes sense to them.

Ayon, this has been a blast so far, but I am going to ask you the last question even though we’re running a little over on time. What’s the one piece of pricing advice you would give our listeners that you think could have a big impact on their business?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

I think understand your customers intimately and take the time to quantify your buyer personas so that you understand the use case of the value proposition, the willingness to pay, the lifetime value, and the customer acquisition costs so that you can better position and package to them and ultimately capture a fair portion of the value delivered to them.

Mark Stiving

Absolutely. The more we understand our customers, the much better we’re going be able to package and price and position so that we can go win more deals. Nice.

Ayon Bhattacharyya

Absolutely.

Mark Stiving

Well, Ayon, thank you so much for your time today. If anybody wants to contact you, how can they do that?

Ayon Bhattacharyya

You can contact me either through my website, which is www.bizgrowthspurt.com or through my LinkedIn profile which ends in value conquer or through my email. You can email me at ayon.b@bizgrowthspurt.com.

Mark Stiving

Perfect. And we’ll have those linked in the show notes so it’ll be easy.

And to our listeners, thank you so much for your time today. If you enjoyed this, would you please leave us a rating and a review? You can get instructions on how to do that by going to ratethispodcast.com/impactpricing. And speaking of reviews, JD Dolan left this review on Amazon for my latest book, “Selling Value: How to Win More Deals at Higher Prices”. He said:

“Selling value belongs in the reference library for all sales and marketing professionals. With a couple of decades in the pricing field under my belt, I have a rather extensive library on the subject. Mark’s book has taken its place as Walter’s “The Price Advantage”, Holden and Burton’s “Pricing with Confidence”, and Madhavan’s “Monetizing Innovation” on my bookshelf. I walk my marketing teams through his value journey map and we plan on using these concepts to systematically improve our marketing efforts in the coming months. Like most great frameworks, it’s simple, which is why it works.”

All I could say is thank you, JD, for mentioning my book along with those other amazing books.

And finally, if you have any questions or comments about this podcast or pricing in general, feel free to email me at mark@impactpricing.com. Now go make an impact.

 

Tags: Accelerate Your Subscription Business, ask a pricing expert, pricing metrics, pricing strategy

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